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Development. 2017 Jun 15;144(12):2104-2122. doi: 10.1242/dev.151035.

Making muscle: skeletal myogenesis in vivo and in vitro.

Chal J1,2,3, Pourquié O4,2,3,5.

Author information

1
Department of Pathology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, 77 Avenue Louis Pasteur, Boston, MA 02115, USA.
2
Department of Genetics, Harvard Medical School, 77 Avenue Louis Pasteur, Boston, MA 02115, USA.
3
Harvard Stem Cell Institute, 77 Avenue Louis Pasteur, Boston, MA 02115, USA.
4
Department of Pathology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, 77 Avenue Louis Pasteur, Boston, MA 02115, USA pourquie@hms.harvard.edu.
5
Institut de Génétique et de Biologie Moléculaire et Cellulaire (IGBMC), CNRS (UMR 7104), Inserm U964, Université de Strasbourg, 67400 Illkirch-Graffenstaden, France.

Abstract

Skeletal muscle is the largest tissue in the body and loss of its function or its regenerative properties results in debilitating musculoskeletal disorders. Understanding the mechanisms that drive skeletal muscle formation will not only help to unravel the molecular basis of skeletal muscle diseases, but also provide a roadmap for recapitulating skeletal myogenesis in vitro from pluripotent stem cells (PSCs). PSCs have become an important tool for probing developmental questions, while differentiated cell types allow the development of novel therapeutic strategies. In this Review, we provide a comprehensive overview of skeletal myogenesis from the earliest premyogenic progenitor stage to terminally differentiated myofibers, and discuss how this knowledge has been applied to differentiate PSCs into muscle fibers and their progenitors in vitro.

KEYWORDS:

Dermomyotome; Embryonic stem cells; Muscle differentiation; Muscular dystrophy; Paraxial mesoderm; Pluripotent stem cells; Skeletal myogenesis; Somite; iPS cells

PMID:
28634270
DOI:
10.1242/dev.151035
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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