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Nutr Res. 2017 Jun;42:1-10. doi: 10.1016/j.nutres.2017.02.010. Epub 2017 Mar 2.

Tea consumption may decrease the risk of osteoporosis: an updated meta-analysis of observational studies.

Author information

1
China Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences, Beijing, China; Cardiovascular Diseases Center, Xiyuan Hospital, China Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences, Beijing, China.
2
Cardiovascular Diseases Center, Xiyuan Hospital, China Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences, Beijing, China; Graduate School, Beijing University of Chinese Medicine, Beijing, China.
3
Graduate School, Beijing University of Chinese Medicine, Beijing, China.
4
China Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences, Beijing, China; Cardiovascular Diseases Center, Xiyuan Hospital, China Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences, Beijing, China. Electronic address: shidazhuo_hua@126.com.

Abstract

Several epidemiological investigations have evaluated the correlation between tea consumption and risk of osteoporosis, but the results are inconsistent. Therefore, we conducted an updated meta-analysis of observational studies to assess this association. We searched for all relevant studies including cohort, cross-sectional, and case-control studies published from database inception to July 15, 2016, using MEDLINE EMBASE, and Cochrane Library. Polled odds ratios (ORs) were calculated using the random-effect model. Fourteen articles (16 studies) that examined 138523 patients were included in this meta-analysis. Seven studies concerning bone mineral density (BMD) showed an increase in BMD with tea consumption, including 4 cross-sectional studies (OR, 0.04, 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.01-0.08) and 3 cohort studies (OR, 0.01; 95% CI, 0.01-0.01). The remaining 9 studies concerning fracture, including 6 case-control studies and 3 cohort studies, showed no association between tea consumption and osteoporotic fracture (OR, 0.86; 95% CI, 0.74-1.01). This updated meta-analysis demonstrates that tea consumption could increase BMD, but the association with osteoporotic fracture requires further investigation. Together, the results highlight the need for future, high-quality-designed clinical trials on tea consumption and osteoporosis.

KEYWORDS:

Bone mineral density; Fracture; Meta-analysis; Osteoporosis; Tea

PMID:
28633866
DOI:
10.1016/j.nutres.2017.02.010
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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