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Environ Health Perspect. 2017 Jun 20;125(6):064501. doi: 10.1289/EHP1788.

The Florence Statement on Triclosan and Triclocarban.

Author information

1
Biodesign Center for Environmental Security, Arizona State University , Tempe, Arizona, USA.
2
Green Science Policy Institute , Berkeley, California, USA.
3
Department of Epidemiology, UNC Gillings School of Global Public Health, University of North Carolina , Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA.
4
Environmental Working Group, Washington, District of Columbia, USA.
5
Department of Civil, Environmental, and Geo-Engineering, University of Minnesota , Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA.
6
Medical University of South Carolina , Department of Public Health Sciences, Charleston, South Carolina, USA.
7
Health Research Communication Strategies , Los Angeles, California, USA.
8
Department of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences, State University of New York, Downstate School of Public Health , Brooklyn, New York, USA.
9
California Safe Cosmetics Program, California Department of Public Health , Richmond, California, USA.
10
University of Rhode Island Graduate School of Oceanography , Narragansett, Rhode Island, USA.
11
Institute for Biogeochemistry and Pollutant Dynamics , ETH Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland.
12
Independent Researcher , Berkeley, California, USA.
13
Science and Environmental Health Network, Ames, Iowa, USA.
14
POPs Environmental Consulting, Schwäbisch Gmünd, Germany.
15
University of Massachusetts Amherst , Amherst, Massachusetts, USA.
16
Department of Chemistry, University of California at Berkeley , Berkeley, California, USA.

Abstract

The Florence Statement on Triclosan and Triclocarban documents a consensus of more than 200 scientists and medical professionals on the hazards of and lack of demonstrated benefit from common uses of triclosan and triclocarban. These chemicals may be used in thousands of personal care and consumer products as well as in building materials. Based on extensive peer-reviewed research, this statement concludes that triclosan and triclocarban are environmentally persistent endocrine disruptors that bioaccumulate in and are toxic to aquatic and other organisms. Evidence of other hazards to humans and ecosystems from triclosan and triclocarban is presented along with recommendations intended to prevent future harm from triclosan, triclocarban, and antimicrobial substances with similar properties and effects. Because antimicrobials can have unintended adverse health and environmental impacts, they should only be used when they provide an evidence-based health benefit. Greater transparency is needed in product formulations, and before an antimicrobial is incorporated into a product, the long-term health and ecological impacts should be evaluated. https://doi.org/10.1289/EHP1788.

PMID:
28632490
PMCID:
PMC5644973
DOI:
10.1289/EHP1788
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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