Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Semin Cell Dev Biol. 2017 Oct;70:177-189. doi: 10.1016/j.semcdb.2017.06.012. Epub 2017 Jun 16.

What have we learned on aging from omics studies?

Author information

1
Laboratory of Biology (BIO@SNS), Scuola Normale Superiore, Pisa, Italy; Leibniz Institute on Aging - Fritz Lipmann Institute (FLI), Jena, Germany. Electronic address: alessandro.cellerino@sns.it.
2
Leibniz Institute on Aging - Fritz Lipmann Institute (FLI), Jena, Germany. Electronic address: alessandro.ori@leibniz-fli.de.

Abstract

Aging is a complex process. Transcriptomic studies of the last decade have identified genes and pathways that are regulated during aging in multiple species and organs. Yet, since a manifold of pathways are regulated and the amplitude of regulation is often small, reproducibility across studies is moderate and disentangling cause-consequence relationships has proven challenging. Here, we review a number of consistent findings in the light of more recent, longitudinal studies and of studies combining transcriptomics and proteomics that identified deregulation of protein biosynthetic pathways as an early event and likely driver of aging.

KEYWORDS:

Aging; Data integration; Genomics; Killifish; Lysosome; Mitochondria; Nothobranchius furzeri; Pathways; Proteasome; Protein complex; Proteomics; Proteostasis; RNAseq; Ribosome; Stoichiometry; Transcriptomics

PMID:
28630026
DOI:
10.1016/j.semcdb.2017.06.012
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center