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Appetite. 2017 Oct 1;117:109-116. doi: 10.1016/j.appet.2017.06.016. Epub 2017 Jun 17.

Fathers' feeding practices and children's weight status in Mexican American families.

Author information

1
School of Public Health, University of California, Berkeley, 50 University Hall, Berkeley, CA, 94720-7360, USA. Electronic address: cpenilla@berkeley.edu.
2
Department of Psychiatry, University of California, San Francisco, Box 0848, San Francisco, CA, 94143-0848, USA. Electronic address: tschannj@ucsf.edu.
3
School of Public Health, University of California, Berkeley, 50 University Hall, Berkeley, CA, 94720-7360, USA. Electronic address: jdeardorff@berkeley.edu.
4
Department of Counseling, University of San Francisco, 2130 Fulton St, San Francisco, CA, 94118, USA. Electronic address: florese@usfca.edu.
5
Department of Psychiatry, University of California, San Francisco, Box 0848, San Francisco, CA, 94143-0848, USA. Electronic address: lauri.pasch@ucsf.edu.
6
Department of Pediatrics, Baylor College of Medicine, USDA/ARS Children's Nutrition Research Center, 1100 Bates St, Houston, TX, 77030-2600, USA. Electronic address: nbutte@bcm.edu.
7
Department of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco, Box 0856, San Francisco, CA, 94143-0856, USA. Electronic address: gregorich@ucsf.edu.
8
Kaiser Permanente, 2200 O'Farrell St, San Francisco, CA, 94115, USA. Electronic address: louise.c.greenspan@kp.org.
9
Nutrition Policy Institute, University of California, 1111 Franklin St, 10th Floor, Oakland, CA, 94607, USA. Electronic address: suzanna.martinez@ucop.edu.
10
School of Public Health, University of California, Berkeley, 50 University Hall, Berkeley, CA, 94720-7360, USA. Electronic address: eozer@berkeley.edu.

Abstract

Mothers' feeding practices are associated with their children's weight status, but little is known about the associations between fathers' feeding practices and children's weight status. Moreover, there is a dearth of research on Latino fathers' feeding practices and children's weight status, even though Latino children suffer some of the highest obesity rates in the U.S. We examined the associations between fathers' feeding practices and child weight status, conditional on mothers' feeding practices, within 174 Mexican American families with children aged 8-10 years. Parents completed the Parental Feeding Practices Questionnaire, which consists of four subscales: positive involvement in child eating, pressure to eat, use of food to control behavior, and restriction of amount of food. To assess child weight status, body mass index (BMI) was calculated and converted to age- and gender-specific percentile scores (BMI z-score). We fit four sets of regression models, one set for each of the four parental feeding practices subscales, with child BMI z-score as the outcome variable. Fathers' pressure to eat (b = -0.20, p = 0.04; 95% CI: -0.39, -0.01) and use of food to control behavior (b = -0.36, p = 0.02; 95% CI: -0.65, -0.07) were associated with lower child BMI z-score, and restriction of amount of food (b = 0.56, p < 0.001; 95% CI: 0.27, 0.84) was associated with higher child BMI z-score, after accounting for mothers' feeding practices. Fathers' positive involvement in child eating was not associated with child BMI z-score. These findings provide empirical evidence that fathers' feeding practices are independently associated with children's weight status, even when mothers' feeding practices are taken into account, and suggest that fathers' feeding practices also matter in regard to children's weight status.

PMID:
28629931
PMCID:
PMC5675558
DOI:
10.1016/j.appet.2017.06.016
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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