Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Fertil Steril. 2017 Aug;108(2):302-311. doi: 10.1016/j.fertnstert.2017.05.037. Epub 2017 Jun 16.

Association of vitamin D intake and serum levels with fertility: results from the Lifestyle and Fertility Study.

Author information

1
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center and Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth, Lebanon, New Hampshire. Electronic address: june.y.fung@gmail.com.
2
Department of Epidemiology, Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia.
3
Division of Laboratory Sciences, National Center for Environmental Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia.
4
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center and Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth, Lebanon, New Hampshire; Community and Family Medicine, Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth, Lebanon, New Hampshire.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To evaluate the role of vitamin D intake and serum levels on conception of clinical pregnancy and live birth.

DESIGN:

Prospective cohort study.

SETTING:

Academic medical centers.

PATIENT(S):

Healthy, nulliparous women, age 18-39 years, and their male partners.

INTERVENTION(S):

None.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE(S):

Clinical pregnancy and live birth were compared between those who did or did not meet the vitamin D estimated average requirement (EAR) intake (10 μg/d) and with serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) considered at risk for inadequacy or deficiency (<50 nmol/L) or sufficient (≥50 nmol/L).

RESULT(S):

Among 132 women, 37.1% did not meet the vitamin D EAR and 13.9% had serum levels at risk for inadequacy or deficiency. Clinical pregnancies were significantly higher among women who met the vitamin D EAR (67.5% vs. 49.0%) and with sufficient serum 25(OH)D (64.3% vs. 38.9%) compared with those who did not. Live births were higher among those who met the vitamin D EAR (59.0% vs. 40.0%). The adjusted odds ratio (AOR) of conceiving a clinical pregnancy was significantly higher among those who met the EAR (AOR = 2.26; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.05-4.86) and had sufficient serum 25(OH)D (AOR = 3.37; 95% CI, 1.06-10.70). The associations were not significant after controlling for selected nutrients and dietary quality.

CONCLUSION(S):

Women with vitamin D intake below EAR and serum 25(OH)D levels at risk for inadequacy or deficiency may be less likely to conceive and might benefit from increased vitamin D intake to achieve adequacy.

CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER:

NCT00642590.

KEYWORDS:

Vitamin D; fertility; pregnancy; serum 25(OH)D

PMID:
28629584
PMCID:
PMC5545066
DOI:
10.1016/j.fertnstert.2017.05.037
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center