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Blood Press Monit. 2017 Dec;22(6):307-313. doi: 10.1097/MBP.0000000000000276.

Effects of salt loading and potassium supplement on the circadian blood pressure profile in salt-sensitive Chinese patients.

Author information

1
aDepartment of Cardiovascular Medicine, First Affiliated Hospital of Xi'an Jiaotong University bNational Health and Family Planning Commission of Shaanxi, Xi'an cShanghai Institute of Hypertension, Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, China.

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE:

Salt-sensitive (SS) patients more frequently showed a nondipper blood pressure pattern and were associated with more serious target organ damage than non-SS patients. We aimed to investigate whether potassium supplement can improve the blunted nocturnal blood pressure fall in SS patients exposed to a high-salt diet.

PATIENTS AND METHODS:

Approximately 49 normotensive and mildly hypertensive Chinese patients received a study protocol of a 3 days of baseline examination, 7 days of a low-salt diet (3 g NaCl/day), 7 days of a high-salt diet (18 g NaCl/day), and 7 days of a high-salt diet with a potassium supplement (18 g NaCl and 4.5 g KCl/day). The 24 h ambulatory blood pressure was determined at the end of each period.

RESULTS:

A total of 14 patients were classified as SS according to the at least 10% increase in their 24-h mean arterial pressure after high-salt loading. The night-to-day blood pressure ratio was significantly higher in SS patients than in non-SS patients during the high-salt loading period (systolic 0.96±0.01 vs. 0.89±0.01, P<0.01; diastolic 0.96±0.01 vs. 0.92±0.01, P<0.05). Compared with the high-salt loading period, the night-to-day blood pressure ratio was significantly reversed by potassium supplement in SS patients (systolic 0.91±0.01 vs. 0.96±0.01, P<0.05; diastolic 0.91±0.01 vs. 0.96±0.01, P<0.05).

CONCLUSION:

Potassium supplement can improve the blunted nocturnal blood pressure fall in SS patients exposed to a high-salt diet, but the related mechanism needs to be studied further.

PMID:
28628530
DOI:
10.1097/MBP.0000000000000276
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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