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Games Health J. 2017 Jun;6(3):147-151. doi: 10.1089/g4h.2017.0017.

Comparison of Path Length and Ranges of Movement of the Center of Pressure and Reaction Time and Between Paired-Play and Solo-Play of a Virtual Reality Game.

Author information

1
1 Department of Occupational Therapy, Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University , Tel Aviv, Israel .
2
2 Timocco Ltd. , Tel Aviv, Israel .

Abstract

AIMS:

To test whether paired-play will induce longer path length and ranges of movement of the center of pressure (COP), which reflects on balance performance and stability, compared to solo-play and to test the difference in the path length and ranges of movement of the COP while playing the virtual reality (VR) game with the dominant hand compared to playing it with the nondominant hand.

METHODS:

In this cross-sectional study 20 children (age 6.1 ± 0.7 years old) played an arm movement controlled VR game alone and with a peer while each of them stood on a pressure measuring pad to track the path length and ranges of movement of the COP.

RESULTS:

The total COP path was significantly higher during the paired-play (median 295.8 cm) compared to the COP path during the solo-play (median 189.2 cm). No significant differences were found in the reaction time and the mediolateral and anterior-posterior COP ranges between solo-play and paired-play. No significant differences were found between the parameters extracted during paired-play with the dominant or nondominant hand.

DISCUSSION:

Our findings imply that the paired-play is advantageous compared to solo-play since it induces a greater movement for the child, during which, higher COP velocities are reached that may contribute to improving the balance control of the child. Apart from the positive social benefits of paired-play, this positive effect on the COP path length is a noteworthy added value in the clinical setting when treating children with balance disorder.

KEYWORDS:

Balance disorder; Games for health; Group activity; Hand dominance

PMID:
28628386
DOI:
10.1089/g4h.2017.0017
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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