Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Microbes Infect. 2017 Sep - Oct;19(9-10):485-491. doi: 10.1016/j.micinf.2017.05.005. Epub 2017 Jun 13.

Comparison of G protein sequences of South African street rabies viruses showing distinct progression of the disease in a mouse model of experimental rabies.

Author information

1
OIE Rabies Reference Laboratory, ARC-Onderstepoort Veterinary Institute (ARC-OVI), Onderstepoort, South Africa; Department of Veterinary Tropical Diseases, Faculty of Veterinary Science, University of Pretoria, South Africa.
2
ANSES, Nancy Laboratory for Rabies and Wildlife, OIE and EU Rabies Reference Laboratory, WHO Collaborative Center for Research and Management in Zoonoses Control, Malzéville, France.
3
Department of Veterinary Tropical Diseases, Faculty of Veterinary Science, University of Pretoria, South Africa.
4
Institut Pasteur, CNRS, Unité de Neuroimmunologie Virale, Département de Virologie Paris, France.
5
OIE Rabies Reference Laboratory, ARC-Onderstepoort Veterinary Institute (ARC-OVI), Onderstepoort, South Africa; Department of Veterinary Tropical Diseases, Faculty of Veterinary Science, University of Pretoria, South Africa. Electronic address: sabetac@arc.agric.za.

Abstract

Rabies is a fatal zoonotic disease and infections generally lead to a fatal encephalomyelitis in both humans and animals. In South Africa, domestic (dogs) and the wildlife (yellow mongoose) host species maintain the canid and mongoose rabies variants respectively. In this study, pathogenicity differences of South African canid and mongoose rabies viruses were investigated in a murine model, by assessing the progression of clinical signs and survivorship. Comparison of glycoprotein gene sequences revealed amino acid differences that may underpin the observed pathogenicity differences. Cumulatively, our results suggest that the canid rabies virus may be more neurovirulent in mice than the mongoose rabies variant.

KEYWORDS:

Canid rabies; Lyssavirus; Mongoose rabies; Neurovirulent; South Africa

PMID:
28627433
DOI:
10.1016/j.micinf.2017.05.005
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center