Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Front Microbiol. 2017 Jun 2;8:996. doi: 10.3389/fmicb.2017.00996. eCollection 2017.

A Syst-OMICS Approach to Ensuring Food Safety and Reducing the Economic Burden of Salmonellosis.

Author information

1
Institute for Integrative and Systems Biology, Université Laval, Québec CityQC, Canada.
2
McGill University, MontréalQC, Canada.
3
National Microbiology Laboratory, Public Health Agency of Canada, OttawaON, Canada.
4
Laboratoire de Santé Publique du Québec, Sainte-Anne-de-BellevueQC, Canada.
5
Université Laval, Québec CityQC, Canada.
6
Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida, GainesvilleFL, United States.
7
Département de Microbiologie, Infectiologie et Immunologie, Université de Montréal, MontréalQC, Canada.
8
Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, SummerlandBC, Canada.
9
Génome Québec Innovation Center, MontréalQC, Canada.
10
Food Safety Engineering, Faculty of Land and Food Systems, University of British Columbia, VancouverBC, Canada.
11
National Institute for Public Health and the EnvironmentBilthoven, Netherlands.
12
Canadian Food Inspection Agency, HalifaxNS, Canada.
13
Bureau of Microbial Hazards, Health Canada, OttawaON, Canada.
14
UC Davis Food Science and Technology, DavisCA, United States.
15
UC Davis School of Veterinary Medicine, DavisCA, United States.
16
Canadian Food Inspection Agency, OttawaON, Canada.
17
Food Science, University of Guelph, GuelphON, Canada.
18
Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Faculty of Pharmacy, Mansoura UniversityMansoura, Egypt.
19
Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Dalhousie University, HalifaxNS, Canada.
20
Department of Biological Sciences, University of Calgary, CalgaryAB, Canada.
21
Institute for Food Safety and Hygiene, University of ZurichZurich, Switzerland.
22
Biological and Chemical Sciences, Wilfrid Laurier University, WaterlooON, Canada.
23
Department of Food Science, Cornell University, IthacaNY, United States.
24
College of Veterinary Medicine, The Ohio State University, ColumbusOH, United States.

Abstract

The Salmonella Syst-OMICS consortium is sequencing 4,500 Salmonella genomes and building an analysis pipeline for the study of Salmonella genome evolution, antibiotic resistance and virulence genes. Metadata, including phenotypic as well as genomic data, for isolates of the collection are provided through the Salmonella Foodborne Syst-OMICS database (SalFoS), at https://salfos.ibis.ulaval.ca/. Here, we present our strategy and the analysis of the first 3,377 genomes. Our data will be used to draw potential links between strains found in fresh produce, humans, animals and the environment. The ultimate goals are to understand how Salmonella evolves over time, improve the accuracy of diagnostic methods, develop control methods in the field, and identify prognostic markers for evidence-based decisions in epidemiology and surveillance.

KEYWORDS:

Salmonella; antibiotic resistance; bacterial genomics; database; foodborne pathogen; next-generation sequencing; phylogeny

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Frontiers Media SA Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center