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Public Health Nutr. 2018 Jan;21(1):125-133. doi: 10.1017/S1368980017001161. Epub 2017 Jun 19.

Ultra-processed foods and added sugars in the Chilean diet (2010).

Author information

1
1Department of Nutrition,School of Public Health,University of São Paulo,São Paulo,Brazil.
2
3Institute of Nutrition and Food Technology (INTA),University of Chile,El Líbano 5524,Macul,Santiago,Chile.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To assess the consumption of ultra-processed foods and analyse its association with the content of added sugars in the Chilean diet.

DESIGN:

Cross-sectional study of national dietary data obtained through 24 h recalls and classified into food groups according to the extent and purpose of food processing (NOVA classification).

SETTING:

Chile.

SUBJECTS:

A probabilistic sample of 4920 individuals (aged 2 years or above) studied in 2010 by a national dietary survey (Encuesta Nacional de Consumo Alimentario).

RESULTS:

Ultra-processed foods represented 28·6 (se 0·5) % of total energy intake and 58·6 (se 0·9) % of added sugars intake. The mean percentage of energy from added sugars increased from 7·7 (se 0·3) to 19·7 (se 0·5) % across quintiles of the dietary share of ultra-processed foods. After adjusting for several potential sociodemographic confounders, a 5 percentage point increase in the dietary share of ultra-processed foods determined a 1 percentage point increase in the dietary content of added sugars. Individuals in the highest quintile were three times more likely (OR=2·9; 95 % CI 2·4, 3·4) to exceed the 10 % upper limit for added sugars recommended by the WHO compared with those in the lowest quintile, after adjusting for sociodemographic variables. This association was strongest among individuals aged 2-19 years (OR=3·9; 95 % CI 2·7, 5·9).

CONCLUSIONS:

In Chile, ultra-processed foods are important contributors to total energy intake and to the consumption of added sugars. Actions aimed at limiting consumption of ultra-processed foods are being implemented as effective ways to achieve WHO dietary recommendations to limit added sugars and processed foods, especially for children and adolescents.

KEYWORDS:

Added sugars; Chile; Energy intake; Food processing; Ultra-processed foods

PMID:
28625223
DOI:
10.1017/S1368980017001161
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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