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AIDS Behav. 2018 Jan;22(1):308-320. doi: 10.1007/s10461-017-1787-5.

The Effects of School-Based Condom Availability Programs (CAPs) on Condom Acquisition, Use and Sexual Behavior: A Systematic Review.

Author information

1
Health Policy Research Department, The Fenway Institute, Fenway Health, Boston, MA, USA.
2
Department of Epidemiology, Brown University School of Public Health, Providence, RI, USA.
3
Health Systems Research Unit, South African Medical Research Council, Francie Van Zijl Drive, Parow Valley, Cape Town, PO BOX 19070, Tygerberg, Western Cape, South Africa. darshini.govindasamy@mrc.ac.za.
4
Adolescent Health Research Unit, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, University of Cape Town, Cape Town, Western Cape, South Africa. darshini.govindasamy@mrc.ac.za.
5
Health Systems Research Unit, South African Medical Research Council, Francie Van Zijl Drive, Parow Valley, Cape Town, PO BOX 19070, Tygerberg, Western Cape, South Africa.
6
Adolescent Health Research Unit, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, University of Cape Town, Cape Town, Western Cape, South Africa.

Abstract

We conducted a systematic review to assess the impact of school-based condom availability programs (CAPs) on condom acquisition, use and sexual behavior. We searched PubMed to identify English-language studies evaluating school-based CAPs that reported process (i.e. number of condoms distributed or used) and sexual behavior measures. We identified nine studies that met our inclusion criteria, with the majority conducted in the United States of America. We judged most studies to have medium risk of bias. Most studies showed that school-based CAPs increased the odds of students obtaining condoms (odds ratios (ORs) for individual studies ranged between 1.81 and 20.28), and reporting condom use (OR 1.36-3.2). Three studies showed that school-based CAPs positively influenced sexual behavior, while no studies reported increase in sexual activity. Findings suggest that school-based CAPs may be an effective strategy for improving condom coverage and promoting positive sexual behaviors.

KEYWORDS:

Adolescent; Condom use; School health; Sexual behavior

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