Format

Send to

Choose Destination
J Nephrol. 2018 Apr;31(2):209-223. doi: 10.1007/s40620-017-0416-8. Epub 2017 Jun 17.

Predicting acute kidney injury: current status and future challenges.

Author information

1
Chair of Nephrology - IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Genomics of Renal Diseases and Hypertension Unit, Università Vita Salute San Raffaele, Via Olgettina 60, 20132, Milan, Italy.
2
Chair of Nephrology - IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Genomics of Renal Diseases and Hypertension Unit, Università Vita Salute San Raffaele, Via Olgettina 60, 20132, Milan, Italy. simonini.marco@hsr.it.

Abstract

Acute kidney injury (AKI) is characterized by an acute decline in renal function and is associated to increased mortality rate, hospitalization time, and total health-related costs. The severity of this 'fearsome' clinical complication might depend on, or even be worsened by, the late detection of AKI, when the diagnosis is based on the elevation of serum creatinine (SCr). For these reasons, in recent years a great number of new tools, biomarkers and predictive models have been proposed to clinicians in order to improve diagnosis and prevent the development of AKI. The purpose of this narrative paper is to review the current state of the art in prediction and early detection of AKI and outline future challenges.

KEYWORDS:

Acute kidney injury; Biomarkers; Genetics; New OMICs; Prediction

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Springer Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center