Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Trends Mol Med. 2017 Jul;23(7):615-635. doi: 10.1016/j.molmed.2017.05.006. Epub 2017 Jun 13.

Pathogenesis of Human Systemic Lupus Erythematosus: A Cellular Perspective.

Author information

1
Division of Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA. Electronic address: vmoulton@bidmc.harvard.edu.
2
Division of Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA.
3
Division of Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA; Department of Rheumatology, Boston Children's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA.
4
Department of Nephrology, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka, Japan.
5
Division of Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA. Electronic address: gtsokos@bidmc.harvard.edu.

Abstract

Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a chronic autoimmune disease affecting multiple organs. A complex interaction of genetics, environment, and hormones leads to immune dysregulation and breakdown of tolerance to self-antigens, resulting in autoantibody production, inflammation, and destruction of end-organs. Emerging evidence on the role of these factors has increased our knowledge of this complex disease, guiding therapeutic strategies and identifying putative biomarkers. Recent findings include the characterization of genetic/epigenetic factors linked to SLE, as well as cellular effectors. Novel observations have provided an improved understanding of the contribution of tissue-specific factors and associated damage, T and B lymphocytes, as well as innate immune cell subsets and their corresponding abnormalities. The intricate web of involved factors and pathways dictates the adoption of tailored therapeutic approaches to conquer this disease.

KEYWORDS:

SLE; autoimmunity; immune cells

PMID:
28623084
PMCID:
PMC5650102
DOI:
10.1016/j.molmed.2017.05.006
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center