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Cell. 2017 Jun 15;169(7):1187-1200. doi: 10.1016/j.cell.2017.05.045.

Dynamic RNA Modifications in Gene Expression Regulation.

Author information

1
Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, and Institute for Biophysical Dynamics, The University of Chicago, 929 East 57(th) Street, Chicago, IL 60637, USA; Medical Scientist Training Program, The University of Chicago, 924 East 57(th) Street, Chicago, IL 60637, USA.
2
Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, and Institute for Biophysical Dynamics, The University of Chicago, 929 East 57(th) Street, Chicago, IL 60637, USA.
3
Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, and Institute for Biophysical Dynamics, The University of Chicago, 929 East 57(th) Street, Chicago, IL 60637, USA. Electronic address: taopan@uchicago.edu.
4
Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, and Institute for Biophysical Dynamics, The University of Chicago, 929 East 57(th) Street, Chicago, IL 60637, USA; Department of Chemistry, The University of Chicago, 929 East 57(th) Street, Chicago, IL 60637, USA; Howard Hughes Medical Institute, The University of Chicago, 929 East 57(th) Street, Chicago, IL 60637, USA. Electronic address: chuanhe@uchicago.edu.

Abstract

Over 100 types of chemical modifications have been identified in cellular RNAs. While the 5' cap modification and the poly(A) tail of eukaryotic mRNA play key roles in regulation, internal modifications are gaining attention for their roles in mRNA metabolism. The most abundant internal mRNA modification is N6-methyladenosine (m6A), and identification of proteins that install, recognize, and remove this and other marks have revealed roles for mRNA modification in nearly every aspect of the mRNA life cycle, as well as in various cellular, developmental, and disease processes. Abundant noncoding RNAs such as tRNAs, rRNAs, and spliceosomal RNAs are also heavily modified and depend on the modifications for their biogenesis and function. Our understanding of the biological contributions of these different chemical modifications is beginning to take shape, but it's clear that in both coding and noncoding RNAs, dynamic modifications represent a new layer of control of genetic information.

PMID:
28622506
PMCID:
PMC5657247
DOI:
10.1016/j.cell.2017.05.045
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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