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Muscle Nerve. 2018 Jan;57(1):25-32. doi: 10.1002/mus.25723. Epub 2017 Jul 6.

Ultrasound-guided hydrodissection decreases gliding resistance of the median nerve within the carpal tunnel.

Author information

1
Biomechanics Laboratory and Tendon and Soft Tissue Biology Laboratory, Division of Orthopedic Research, Mayo Clinic, 200 1st Street SW, Rochester, Minnesota, USA.
2
Department of Plastic, Reconstructive and Hand surgery, Erasmus MC, Rotterdam, the Netherlands.
3
Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Erasmus MC, Rotterdam, the Netherlands.
4
Departments of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Radiology and Anatomy, Mayo clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, USA.
5
Department of Biomedical Statistics and Informatics, Mayo clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, USA.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

The aim of this study was to assess alterations in median nerve (MN) biomechanics within the carpal tunnel resulting from ultrasound-guided hydrodissection in a cadaveric model.

METHODS:

Twelve fresh frozen human cadaver hands were used. MN gliding resistance was measured at baseline and posthydrodissection, by pulling the nerve proximally and then returning it to the origin. Six specimens were treated with hydrodissection, and 6 were used as controls.

RESULTS:

In the hydrodissection group there was a significant reduction in mean peak gliding resistance of 92.9 ± 34.8 mN between baseline and immediately posthydrodissection (21.4% ± 10.5%; P = 0.001). No significant reduction between baseline and the second cycle occurred in the control group: 9.6 ± 29.8 mN (0.4% ± 5.3%; P = 0.467).

DISCUSSION:

Hydrodissection can decrease the gliding resistance of the MN within the carpal tunnel, at least in wrists unaffected by carpal tunnel syndrome. A clinical trial of hydrodissection seems justified. Muscle Nerve 57: 25-32, 2018.

KEYWORDS:

carpal tunnel; gliding resistance; hydrodissection; injection; nerve; ultrasound

PMID:
28622409
PMCID:
PMC5722677
DOI:
10.1002/mus.25723
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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