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Med Educ Online. 2017;22(1):1338504. doi: 10.1080/10872981.2017.1338504.

The gap between medical faculty's perceptions and use of e-learning resources.

Author information

1
a Department of Medical Education , Dongguk University School of Medicine , Goyang , Republic of Korea.
2
b Department of Medical Education , Jeju National University School of Medicine , Jeju , Republic of Korea.
3
c Department of Emergency Medicine , Soonchunhyang University School of Medicine , Bucheon , Republic of Korea.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

e-Learning resources have become increasingly popular in medical education; however, there has been scant research on faculty perceptions and use of these resources.

OBJECTIVE:

To investigate medical faculty's use of e-learning resources and to draw on practical implications for fostering their use of such resources.

DESIGN:

Approximately 500 full-time faculty members in 35 medical schools across the nation in South Korea were invited to participate in a 30-item questionnaire on their perceptions and use of e-learning resources in medical education. The questionnaires were distributed in both online and paper formats. Descriptive analysis and reliability analysis were conducted of the data.

RESULTS:

Eighty faculty members from 28 medical schools returned the questionnaires. Twenty-two percent of respondents were female and 78% were male, and their rank, disciplines, and years of teaching experience all varied. Participants had positive perceptions of e-learning resources in terms of usefulness for student learning and usability; still, only 39% of them incorporated those resources in their teaching. The most frequently selected reasons for not using e-learning resources in their teaching were 'lack of resources relevant to my lectures,' 'lack of time to use them during lectures,' and 'was not aware of their availability.'

CONCLUSIONS:

Our study indicates a gap between medical faculty's positive perceptions of e-learning resources and their low use of such resources. Our findings highlight the needs for further study of individual and institutional barriers to faculty adoption of e-learning resources to bridge this gap.

KEYWORDS:

Medical education; e-learning; faculty perceptions; teaching and learning

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