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J Autism Dev Disord. 2017 Sep;47(9):2783-2794. doi: 10.1007/s10803-017-3200-7.

A Prospective Study of the Concordance of DSM-IV and DSM-5 Diagnostic Criteria for Autism Spectrum Disorder.

Author information

1
Department of Health Psychology, Thompson Center for Autism and Neurodevelopmental Disorders, University of Missouri, 205 Portland Street, Columbia, MO, 65211, USA. mazurekm@missouri.edu.
2
Curry School of Education, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA, USA. mazurekm@missouri.edu.
3
Biostatistics Center, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, USA.
4
Besser Center for BRCA, Abramson Cancer Center, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, USA.
5
Department of Pediatrics and Psychology, Nationwide Children's Hospital, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USA.
6
Division of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH, USA.
7
Division of Developmental Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN, USA.
8
Department of Pediatrics, Children's Hospital Los Angeles, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, USA.
9
Department of Health Psychology, Thompson Center for Autism and Neurodevelopmental Disorders, University of Missouri, 205 Portland Street, Columbia, MO, 65211, USA.
10
Department of Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.
11
Department of Psychiatry, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA, USA.

Abstract

The transition from DSM-IV to DSM-5 criteria for autism spectrum disorder (ASD) sparked considerable concern about the potential implications of these changes. This study was designed to address limitations of prior studies by prospectively examining the concordance of DSM-IV and final DSM-5 criteria on a consecutive sample of 439 children referred for autism diagnostic evaluations. Concordance and discordance were assessed using a consistent diagnostic battery. DSM-5 criteria demonstrated excellent overall specificity and good sensitivity relative to DSM-IV criteria. Sensitivity and specificity were strongest for children meeting DSM-IV criteria for autistic disorder, but poor for those meeting criteria for Asperger's disorder and pervasive developmental disorder. Higher IQ, older age, female sex, and less pronounced ASD symptoms were associated with greater discordance.

KEYWORDS:

Autism spectrum disorder; Concordance; DSM-5; Sensitivity; Specificity

PMID:
28620892
DOI:
10.1007/s10803-017-3200-7
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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