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Brain Behav Immun. 2017 Oct;65:342-349. doi: 10.1016/j.bbi.2017.06.005. Epub 2017 Jun 13.

Childhood maltreatment severity is associated with elevated C-reactive protein and body mass index in adults with schizophrenia and bipolar diagnoses.

Author information

1
NORMENT K.G Jebsen Centre for Psychosis Research, Institute of Clinical Medicine, Norway. Electronic address: monica.aas@medisin.uio.no.
2
NORMENT K.G Jebsen Centre for Psychosis Research, Institute of Clinical Medicine, Norway.
3
NORMENT K.G Jebsen Centre for Psychosis Research, Institute of Clinical Medicine, Norway; Drammen District Psychiatric Center, Clinic of Mental Health and Addiction, Vestre Viken Hospital Trust, Drammen, Norway.
4
Research Institute of Internal Medicine, Oslo University Hospital, Rikshospitalet, Oslo, Norway; Section of Clinical Immunology and Infectious Diseases, Oslo University Hospital, Rikshospitalet, Norway; K.G. Jebsen Inflammatory Research Center, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
5
NORMENT K.G Jebsen Centre for Psychosis Research, Institute of Clinical Medicine, Norway; Department of Psychiatric Research, Diakonhjemmet Hospital, Oslo, Norway; Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Several studies have described an association between childhood maltreatment and inflammatory markers in the psychotic disorders (schizophrenia [SZ] and bipolar disorder [BD]). Previous studies have been relatively small (<50 participants), and the severity of abuse and the putative influence of body mass index (BMI) have not been properly investigated.

METHODS:

The combined effects of childhood abuse severity and clinical diagnosis on inflammatory markers were investigated in a large sample (n=483) of patients with a disorder on the psychosis spectrum and in healthy controls (HCs). Plasma levels of inflammatory markers (high-sensitivity C-reactive protein [hs-CRP], soluble tumor necrosis factor receptor type 1 [TNFR-R1], glycoprotein 130 [gp130]) were analyzed, and BMI and data on childhood trauma events, on the basis of the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire (CTQ), were obtained from all participants.

RESULTS:

Patients had increased levels of hs-CRP (P<0.001, Cohens d=0.4), lower levels of gp130 (P<0.001, Cohens d=0.5), higher BMI (P<0.001, Cohens d=0.5) and reported more childhood maltreatment experiences (P<0.001, Cohens d=1.2) than the HC group. The severity of childhood abuse (up to three types of abuse: sexual abuse, physical abuse, and emotional abuse) was associated with elevated BMI (f=8.46, P<0.001, Cohen's d=0.5) and hs-CRP (f=5.47, P=0.001, Cohen's d=0.3). Combined effects of patient status and severity of childhood abuse were found for elevated hs-CRP (f=4.76, P<0.001, Cohen's d=0.4). Differences among the groups disappeared when BMI was added to the model.

DISCUSSION:

Trauma-altered immune activation via elevated hs-CRP in patients with SZ and BD may be mediated by higher BMI; however, the direction of this association needs further clarification.

KEYWORDS:

BMI; Bipolar disorders; Childhood trauma; Inflammation; Schizophrenia

PMID:
28619247
DOI:
10.1016/j.bbi.2017.06.005
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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