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BMC Res Notes. 2017 Jun 15;10(1):214. doi: 10.1186/s13104-017-2531-y.

Feasibility of a physical activity intervention during and shortly after chemotherapy for testicular cancer.

Author information

1
National Advisory Unit on Late Effects After Cancer Treatment, Oslo University Hospital, Box 4950, Nydalen, 0424 OSLO, Oslo, Norway. LKA@ous-hf.no.
2
Clinical Manager, Medical Affairs, Coloplast A/S, Humlebæk, Denmark.
3
Department of Behavioral Sciences in Medicine, University of Oslo/Regional Advisory Unit in Palliative Care, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway.
4
National Advisory Unit on Late Effects After Cancer Treatment, Oslo University Hospital, Box 4950, Nydalen, 0424 OSLO, Oslo, Norway.
5
Department of Cancer Rehabilitation, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway.
6
Department of Pulmonary Medicine, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway.
7
Department of Oncology, Akershus University Hospital, Lorenskog, Norway.
8
Akershus University Hospital, Lorenskog, Norway.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Given the risk of developing acute and long-term adverse effects in patients receiving cisplatin-based chemotherapy for testicular cancer (TC), risk-reducing interventions, such as physical activity (PA), may be relevant. Limited knowledge is available on the challenges met when conducting PA intervention trials in patients with TC during and shortly after chemotherapy. The aims of the present feasibility study are therefore to determine patient recruitment, compliance and adherence to a PA intervention.

RESULTS:

Patients with metastatic TC referred to cisplatin-based chemotherapy were eligible. They followed an individual low-threshold PA intervention, including counseling from a personal coach during and 3 months after chemotherapy. Outcomes were recruitment rate, compliance rate and adherence to the intervention including preferences for type of PA and barriers for PA. During 8 months 12 of 18 eligible patients were invited, all consented, but three dropped out. Walking and low intensity activities were preferred and nausea and feeling unwell were the most often reported barriers towards PA.

DISCUSSION:

In order to achieve adequate recruitment, compliance and complete data in future PA intervention trials, close cooperation with treating physicians, individual PA plans and availability of personalized coaching are required. Trial registration NCT01749774, November 2012, ClinicalTrials.gov.

KEYWORDS:

Chemotherapy; Feasibility; Physical activity; Testicular cancer

PMID:
28619116
PMCID:
PMC5472911
DOI:
10.1186/s13104-017-2531-y
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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