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MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2017 Jun 16;66(23):615-621. doi: 10.15585/mmwr.mm6623e1.

Pregnancy Outcomes After Maternal Zika Virus Infection During Pregnancy - U.S. Territories, January 1, 2016-April 25, 2017.

Author information

1
Division of Emergency Operations, Office of Public Health Preparedness and Response, CDC.
2
Division of Global Migration and Quarantine, National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases, CDC.
3
Division of Unintentional Injury Prevention, National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, CDC.
4
Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry.
5
Division of Congenital and Developmental Disorders, National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities, CDC.
6
Division of Global HIV and TB, Center for Global Health, CDC.
7
Division of Reproductive Health, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, CDC.
8
Division of Tuberculosis Elimination, National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention, CDC.
9
Epidemic Intelligence Service, CDC.
10
Division of HIV/AIDS Prevention, National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention, CDC.
11
Global Immunization Division, Center for Global Health, CDC.
12
Influenza Division, National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases, CDC.
13
Division of Human Development and Disability, National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities, CDC.
14
Division of State and Local Readiness, Office of Public Health Preparedness and Response, CDC.
15
Office of the Director, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, CDC.
16
Division of Foodborne, Waterborne and Environmental Diseases, National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases, CDC.
17
Division of Healthcare Quality Promotion, National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases, CDC.

Abstract

Pregnant women living in or traveling to areas with local mosquito-borne Zika virus transmission are at risk for Zika virus infection, which can lead to severe fetal and infant brain abnormalities and microcephaly (1). In February 2016, CDC recommended 1) routine testing for Zika virus infection of asymptomatic pregnant women living in areas with ongoing local Zika virus transmission at the first prenatal care visit, 2) retesting during the second trimester for women who initially test negative, and 3) testing of pregnant women with signs or symptoms consistent with Zika virus disease (e.g., fever, rash, arthralgia, or conjunctivitis) at any time during pregnancy (2). To collect information about pregnant women with laboratory evidence of recent possible Zika virus infection* and outcomes in their fetuses and infants, CDC established pregnancy and infant registries (3). During January 1, 2016-April 25, 2017, U.S. territories with local transmission of Zika virus reported 2,549 completed pregnancies§ (live births and pregnancy losses at any gestational age) with laboratory evidence of recent possible Zika virus infection; 5% of fetuses or infants resulting from these pregnancies had birth defects potentially associated with Zika virus infection (4,5). Among completed pregnancies with positive nucleic acid tests confirming Zika infection identified in the first, second, and third trimesters, the percentage of fetuses or infants with possible Zika-associated birth defects was 8%, 5%, and 4%, respectively. Among liveborn infants, 59% had Zika laboratory testing results reported to the pregnancy and infant registries. Identification and follow-up of infants born to women with laboratory evidence of recent possible Zika virus infection during pregnancy permits timely and appropriate clinical intervention services (6).

PMID:
28617773
DOI:
10.15585/mmwr.mm6623e1
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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