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Elife. 2017 Jun 15;6. pii: e22861. doi: 10.7554/eLife.22861.

A subset of ipRGCs regulates both maturation of the circadian clock and segregation of retinogeniculate projections in mice.

Author information

1
Department of Biology, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, United States.
2
Department of Biology, Stanford University, Stanford, United States.
3
Department of Biology, Program in Integrated Bioscience, The University of Akron, Akron, United States.
4
Department of Neuroscience, Brown University, Providence, United States.
5
Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, Washington University, St. Louis, United States.
6
Department of Neurobiology, Northwestern University, Evanston, United States.
7
Cellular Neurobiology Research Unit, Institut De Recherches Cliniques De Montréal, Montreal, Canada.
8
Indigo Agriculture, Charlestown, United States.
9
Faculty of Medicine, Université De Montréal, Montreal, Canada.
10
Department of Biology, Washington University, St. Louis, United States.

Abstract

The visual system consists of two major subsystems, image-forming circuits that drive conscious vision and non-image-forming circuits for behaviors such as circadian photoentrainment. While historically considered non-overlapping, recent evidence has uncovered crosstalk between these subsystems. Here, we investigated shared developmental mechanisms. We revealed an unprecedented role for light in the maturation of the circadian clock and discovered that intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs) are critical for this refinement process. In addition, ipRGCs regulate retinal waves independent of light, and developmental ablation of a subset of ipRGCs disrupts eye-specific segregation of retinogeniculate projections. Specifically, a subset of ipRGCs, comprising ~200 cells and which project intraretinally and to circadian centers in the brain, are sufficient to mediate both of these developmental processes. Thus, this subset of ipRGCs constitute a shared node in the neural networks that mediate light-dependent maturation of the circadian clock and light-independent refinement of retinogeniculate projections.

KEYWORDS:

axonal refinement; circadian; ipRGC; lateral geniculate nucleus; melanopsin; mouse; neuroscience; suprachiasmatic nucleus

PMID:
28617242
PMCID:
PMC5513697
DOI:
10.7554/eLife.22861
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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