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Can J Psychiatry. 2017 Dec;62(12):818-826. doi: 10.1177/0706743717714468. Epub 2017 Jun 15.

Temporal Trends in the Prevalence and Incidence of Diagnosed ADHD in Children and Young Adults between 1999 and 2012 in Canada: A Data Linkage Study.

Author information

1
1 University of Sherbrooke, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Research Center-Hôpital Charles LeMoyne, Longueuil, Québec.
2
2 Bureau d'information et d'études en santé des populations, Institut national de santé publique du Québec, Québec City, Québec.
3
3 Institut National de Santé Publique du Québec, Québec.
4
4 Manitoba Centre for Health Policy, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba.
5
5 Department of Community Health and Epidemiology, Faculty of Medicine, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia.
6
6 Department of Psychiatry, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario.
7
7 School of Medicine, The University of Queensland, Queensland, Australia.
8
8 Departments of Psychiatry, Community Health and Epidemiology, Faculty of Medicine, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia.
9
9 Oregon Health and Sciences University, Portland, Oregon.
10
10 Institute of Health Economics, Edmonton, Alberta.
11
11 Department of Psychiatry, CIUSSS Douglas Mental Health University Institute, McGill University, Montreal, Québec.
12
12 Université de Montréal, Institut Universitaire de Santé Mentale Montréal, Montréal, Québec.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

There is a need for the routine monitoring of treated attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) for timely policy making. The objective is to report and assess over a decade the prevalence and incidence of diagnosed ADHD in Canada.

METHODS:

Administrative linked patient data from the provinces of Manitoba, Ontario, Quebec, and Nova Scotia were obtained from the same sources as the Canadian Chronic Diseases Surveillance Systems to assess the prevalence and incidence of a primary physician diagnosis of ADHD ( ICD-9 and ICD-10 codes: 314, F90.x) for consultations in outpatient and inpatient settings (Med-Echo in Quebec, the Canadian Institute of Health Information Discharge Abstract Database in the 3 other provinces, plus the Ontario Mental Health Reporting System). Dates of service, diagnosis, and physician specialty were retained. The estimates were presented in yearly brackets between 1999-2000 and 2011-2012 by age and sex groups.

RESULTS:

The prevalence of ADHD between 1999 and 2012 increased in all provinces and for all groups. The prevalence was approximately 3 times higher in boys than in girls, and the highest prevalence was observed in the 10- to 14-year age group. The incidence increased between 1999 and 2012 in Manitoba, Quebec, and Nova Scotia but remained stable in Ontario. Incident cases were more frequently diagnosed by general practitioners followed by either psychiatrists or paediatricians depending on the province.

CONCLUSION:

The prevalence and incidence of diagnosed ADHD did not increase similarly across all provinces in Canada between 1999 and 2012. Over half of cases were diagnosed by a general practitioner.

KEYWORDS:

ADHD; data linkage; diagnosis; surveillance; temporal trends

PMID:
28616934
PMCID:
PMC5714116
DOI:
10.1177/0706743717714468
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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