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Am J Ind Med. 2017 Jul;60(7):635-643. doi: 10.1002/ajim.22728.

Computer-based training (CBT) intervention reduces workplace violence and harassment for homecare workers.

Author information

1
Johns Hopkins School of Nursing, Baltimore, Maryland.
2
Center for Health Research, Kaiser Permanente Northwest, Portland, Oregon.
3
Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, Oregon.
4
Florida International University, Miami, Florida.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The study examines the effectiveness of a workplace violence and harassment prevention and response program with female homecare workers in a consumer driven model of care.

METHODS:

Homecare workers were randomized to either; computer based training (CBT only) or computer-based training with homecare worker peer facilitation (CBT + peer). Participants completed measures on confidence, incidents of violence, and harassment, health and work outcomes at baseline, 3, 6 months post-baseline.

RESULTS:

Homecare workers reported improved confidence to prevent and respond to workplace violence and harassment and a reduction in incidents of workplace violence and harassment in both groups at 6-month follow-up. A decrease in negative health and work outcomes associated with violence and harassment were not reported in the groups.

CONCLUSION:

CBT alone or with trained peer facilitation with homecare workers can increase confidence and reduce incidents of workplace violence and harassment in a consumer-driven model of care.

KEYWORDS:

computer-based training; consumer-employers; homecare workers; sexual harassment; workplace violence

PMID:
28616887
DOI:
10.1002/ajim.22728
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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