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Cell Rep. 2017 Jun 13;19(11):2396-2409. doi: 10.1016/j.celrep.2017.05.054.

Single Muscle Fiber Proteomics Reveals Fiber-Type-Specific Features of Human Muscle Aging.

Author information

1
Max-Planck-Institute of Biochemistry, Martinsried 82152, Germany; Department of Biomedical Science, University of Padova, Padua 35121, Italy. Electronic address: mmurgia@biochem.mpg.de.
2
Department of Biomedical Science, University of Padova, Padua 35121, Italy.
3
Max-Planck-Institute of Biochemistry, Martinsried 82152, Germany.
4
Venetian Institute of Molecular Medicine, Padua 35129, Italy; Department of Medicine, University of Padua, Padua 35128, Italy.
5
Department of Neurosciences, University of Padova, Padua 35128, Italy.
6
Venetian Institute of Molecular Medicine, Padua 35129, Italy.
7
Max-Planck-Institute of Biochemistry, Martinsried 82152, Germany. Electronic address: mmann@biochem.mpg.de.

Abstract

Skeletal muscle is a key tissue in human aging, which affects different muscle fiber types unequally. We developed a highly sensitive single muscle fiber proteomics workflow to study human aging and show that the senescence of slow and fast muscle fibers is characterized by diverging metabolic and protein quality control adaptations. Whereas mitochondrial content declines with aging in both fiber types, glycolysis and glycogen metabolism are upregulated in slow but downregulated in fast muscle fibers. Aging mitochondria decrease expression of the redox enzyme monoamine oxidase A. Slow fibers upregulate a subset of actin and myosin chaperones, whereas an opposite change happens in fast fibers. These changes in metabolism and sarcomere quality control may be related to the ability of slow, but not fast, muscle fibers to maintain their mass during aging. We conclude that single muscle fiber analysis by proteomics can elucidate pathophysiology in a sub-type-specific manner.

KEYWORDS:

aging; atrophy; glycolysis; mitochondria; proteomics; single fibers; skeletal muscle

PMID:
28614723
DOI:
10.1016/j.celrep.2017.05.054
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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