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Child Care Health Dev. 2017 Jun 14. doi: 10.1111/cch.12482. [Epub ahead of print]

Influence of eating quickly and eating until full on anthropometric gains in girls: A population-based, longitudinal study.

Author information

1
Department of Public Health, Showa University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan.
2
Division of Diabetes, Metabolism and Endocrinology, Department of Internal Medicine, Jikei University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

In examining childhood overweight/obesity, there is a need to consider both eating quickly and eating until full. This longitudinal study investigated the influence of eating quickly and/or eating until full on anthropometric variables and becoming overweight/obese among Japanese schoolgirls.

METHODS:

Study participants were fourth-grade schoolgirls (aged 9 or 10 years) in Ina Town, Japan. Physical examinations and a questionnaire survey were performed at baseline (fourth grade) and after 3 years (seventh grade). Height, weight, and waist circumference were measured in the physical examinations, while the data on eating quickly and eating until full were collected in the questionnaire survey. Analysis of variance and analysis of covariance were used to compare the differences in each anthropometric variable between fourth and seventh grade among groups.

RESULTS:

Data on 425 non-overweight/obese schoolgirls in fourth grade were analyzed. Gains in anthropometric variables (body mass index, waist circumference, and waist-to-height ratio) from fourth to seventh grade were significantly larger in the "eating quickly and eating until full" group than in the "not eating quickly and not eating until full" group. In contrast, there were no significant differences in the gains between the "eating quickly or eating until full" group and the "not eating quickly and not eating until full" group. The proportion of overweight/obese girls in seventh grade was higher in the "eating quickly and eating until full" group than in the other groups.

CONCLUSIONS:

Eating quickly and eating until full had a substantial impact on excess gains in anthropometric variables among schoolgirls, suggesting that modifying these eating behaviors may help prevent non-overweight/obese girls from the excess gains. Accordingly, school health programs need to focus on not eating quickly and/or not eating until full to prevent overweight/obesity; it is necessary to emphasize "the risk of overweight/obesity associated with these eating behaviors" in schools.

KEYWORDS:

anthropometric variables; eating quickly; eating until full; longitudinal study

PMID:
28612455
DOI:
10.1111/cch.12482
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