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J Diabetes Complications. 2017 Aug;31(8):1275-1282. doi: 10.1016/j.jdiacomp.2017.05.014. Epub 2017 Jun 4.

Impaired balance is related to the progression of diabetic complications in both young and older adults.

Author information

1
Department of Metabolic Medicine, Kumamoto University, 1-1-1 Honjo, Chuo-ku, Kumamoto 860-8556, Japan. Electronic address: kukidome@kuh.kumamoto-u.ac.jp.
2
Department of Metabolic Medicine, National Hospital Organization Kumamoto Medical Center, 1-5 Ninomaru, Chuo-ku, Kumamoto 860-0008, Japan. Electronic address: t-nishikawa@kumamed.jp.
3
Department of Metabolic Medicine, Kumamoto University, 1-1-1 Honjo, Chuo-ku, Kumamoto 860-8556, Japan. Electronic address: satoum@kuh.kumamoto-u.ac.jp.
4
Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kumamoto University, 1-1-1 Honjo, Chuo-ku, Kumamoto 860-8556, Japan.. Electronic address: nishiko@kuh.kumamoto-u.ac.jp.
5
Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kumamoto University, 1-1-1 Honjo, Chuo-ku, Kumamoto 860-8556, Japan.. Electronic address: shi-risa@kuh.kumamoto-u.ac.jp.
6
Department of Metabolic Medicine, Kumamoto University, 1-1-1 Honjo, Chuo-ku, Kumamoto 860-8556, Japan. Electronic address: junjikawa@mac.com.
7
Department of Metabolic Medicine, Kumamoto University, 1-1-1 Honjo, Chuo-ku, Kumamoto 860-8556, Japan; Department of Food and Health Environment, Faculty of Environmental and Symbiotic Sciences, Prefectural University of Kumamoto, 3-1-100, Tsukide, Higashi-ku, Kumamoto 862-8502, Japan. Electronic address: sshimoda@pu-kumamoto.ac.jp.
8
Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kumamoto University, 1-1-1 Honjo, Chuo-ku, Kumamoto 860-8556, Japan.. Electronic address: mizuta@kumamoto-u.ac.jp.
9
Department of Metabolic Medicine, Kumamoto University, 1-1-1 Honjo, Chuo-ku, Kumamoto 860-8556, Japan. Electronic address: earaki@gpo.kumamoto-u.ac.jp.

Abstract

AIMS:

To investigate the balance ability in younger and older adults with diabetes and evaluate the associations between balance ability and microvascular complications.

METHODS:

This cross-sectional observational study compared 162 participants and 177 controls with and without type 2 diabetes, respectively. Balance ability was assessed using two static (one-legged stance and postural sway area) and two dynamic (Timed Up and Go [TUG] and Functional Reach) tests. Diabetic microangiopathy was also evaluated.

RESULTS:

Participants with diabetes, including both younger (<50years) and older (≥50years) participants, showed significantly worse balance ability in all four tests and were more likely to have a history of falls than the controls (all P<0.01). In all age groups, severe impairment of balance ability was associated with progression of diabetic microvascular complications. In all and older diabetic adults, a longer duration of diabetes (P=0.022) and higher TUG test score (P=0.004), and female sex (P=0.01) and higher TUG score (P=0.001), respectively, were related to a history of falls. On the other hand, among younger diabetic adults, only a non-significant association with longer duration of diabetes (P=0.066) was observed.

CONCLUSIONS:

Impaired balance ability correlates with microvascular diabetic complications. Accurate assessment of balance ability in adults with diabetes could predict the risk of falls, particularly benefitting people with diabetic complications.

KEYWORDS:

Diabetes; Diabetic complications; Impaired balance ability; Risk of falls; Young adult

PMID:
28610947
DOI:
10.1016/j.jdiacomp.2017.05.014
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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