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Sci Rep. 2017 Jun 12;7(1):3289. doi: 10.1038/s41598-017-03315-6.

Characterisation of a stable laboratory co-culture of acidophilic nanoorganisms.

Author information

1
Department of Applied Biology, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Karlsruhe, Germany.
2
Computational Biology of Infection Research, Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Braunschweig, Germany.
3
German Center for Infection Research (DZIF), partner site Hannover-Braunschweig, Braunschweig, Germany.
4
Max von Pettenkofer-Institute of Hygiene and Medical Microbiology, Ludwig-Maximilians-University of Munich, Munich, Germany.
5
Department of Applied Biology, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Karlsruhe, Germany. johannes.gescher@kit.edu.
6
Institute for Biological Interfaces, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen, Germany. johannes.gescher@kit.edu.

Abstract

This study describes the laboratory cultivation of ARMAN (Archaeal Richmond Mine Acidophilic Nanoorganisms). After 2.5 years of successive transfers in an anoxic medium containing ferric sulfate as an electron acceptor, a consortium was attained that is comprised of two members of the order Thermoplasmatales, a member of a proposed ARMAN group, as well as a fungus. The 16S rRNA identity of one archaeon is only 91.6% compared to the most closely related isolate Thermogymnomonas acidicola. Hence, this organism is the first member of a new genus. The enrichment culture is dominated by this microorganism and the ARMAN. The third archaeon in the community seems to be present in minor quantities and has a 100% 16S rRNA identity to the recently isolated Cuniculiplasma divulgatum. The enriched ARMAN species is most probably incapable of sugar metabolism because the key genes for sugar catabolism and anabolism could not be identified in the metagenome. Metatranscriptomic analysis suggests that the TCA cycle funneled with amino acids is the main metabolic pathway used by the archaea of the community. Microscopic analysis revealed that growth of the ARMAN is supported by the formation of cell aggregates. These might enable feeding of the ARMAN by or on other community members.

PMID:
28607432
PMCID:
PMC5468238
DOI:
10.1038/s41598-017-03315-6
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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