Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Sci Rep. 2017 Jun 12;7(1):3275. doi: 10.1038/s41598-017-03374-9.

Selective inhibition of small-diameter axons using infrared light.

Author information

1
Department of Pediatrics, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH, USA.
2
Department of Biology, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH, USA.
3
Department of Biomedical Engineering, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH, USA.
4
Department of Cell Biology, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, USA.
5
Department of Biomedical Engineering, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN, USA.
6
Biobehavioral Program in Oncology, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, PA, USA.
7
Department of Medicine: Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA, USA.
8
Department of Anesthesiology, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA, USA.
9
Center for Neuroscience, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, USA.
10
Department of Neurosciences, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH, USA.
11
Department of Pediatrics, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH, USA. mwj5@case.edu.
12
Department of Biomedical Engineering, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH, USA. mwj5@case.edu.

Abstract

Novel clinical treatments to target peripheral nerves are being developed which primarily use electrical current. Recently, infrared (IR) light was shown to inhibit peripheral nerves with high spatial and temporal specificity. Here, for the first time, we demonstrate that IR can selectively and reversibly inhibit small-diameter axons at lower radiant exposures than large-diameter axons. We provide a mathematical rationale, and then demonstrate it experimentally in individual axons of identified neurons in the marine mollusk Aplysia californica, and in axons within the vagus nerve of a mammal, the musk shrew Suncus murinus. The ability to selectively, rapidly, and reversibly control small-diameter sensory fibers may have many applications, both for the analysis of physiology, and for treating diseases of the peripheral nervous system, such as chronic nausea, vomiting, pain, and hypertension. Moreover, the mathematical analysis of how IR affects the nerve could apply to other techniques for controlling peripheral nerve signaling.

PMID:
28607402
PMCID:
PMC5468240
DOI:
10.1038/s41598-017-03374-9
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Nature Publishing Group Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center