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Sci Rep. 2017 Jun 12;7(1):3244. doi: 10.1038/s41598-017-02722-z.

Coral lipid bodies as the relay center interconnecting diel-dependent lipidomic changes in different cellular compartments.

Author information

1
Department of Marine Biotechnology and Resources, National Sun Yat-sen University, Kaohsiung, 804, Taiwan.
2
Graduate Institute of Marine Biology, National Dong-Hwa University, Checheng, Pingtung, 944, Taiwan.
3
Taiwan Coral Research Center, National Museum of Marine Biology and Aquarium, Checheng, Pingtung, 944, Taiwan.
4
Department of Biological Science and Technology, I-Shou University, Kaohsiung, 824, Taiwan.
5
Khaled bin Sultan Living Oceans Foundation, Annapolis, MD, 21403, United States of America.
6
The Mina and Everard Goodman Faculty of Life Sciences, Bar Ilan University, Ramat Gan, 52900, Israel.
7
Department of Marine Biotechnology and Resources, National Sun Yat-sen University, Kaohsiung, 804, Taiwan. cchen@nmmba.gov.tw.
8
Graduate Institute of Marine Biology, National Dong-Hwa University, Checheng, Pingtung, 944, Taiwan. cchen@nmmba.gov.tw.
9
Taiwan Coral Research Center, National Museum of Marine Biology and Aquarium, Checheng, Pingtung, 944, Taiwan. cchen@nmmba.gov.tw.

Abstract

Lipid bodies (LBs) in the coral gastrodermal tissues are key organelles in the regulation of endosymbiosis and exhibit a diel rhythmicity. Using the scleractinian Euphyllia glabrescens collected across the diel cycle, we observed temporally dynamic lipid profiles in three cellular compartments: host coral gastrodermal cells, LBs, and in hospite Symbiodinium. Particularly, the lipidome varied over time, demonstrating the temporally variable nature of the coral-Symbiodinium endosymbiosis. The lipidome-scale data highlight the dynamic, light-driven metabolism of such associations and reveal that LBs are not only lipid storage organelles but also act as a relay center in metabolic trafficking. Furthermore, lipogenesis in LBs is significantly regulated by coral hosts and the lipid metabolites within holobionts featured predominantly triacylglycerols, sterol esters, and free fatty acids. Given these findings through a time-varied lipidome status, the present study provided valuable insights likely to be crucial to understand the cellular biology of the coral-Symbiodinium endosymbiosis.

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