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J Leukoc Biol. 2017 Sep;102(3):657-675. doi: 10.1189/jlb.2MR0317-105R. Epub 2017 Jun 12.

Shp1 function in myeloid cells.

Author information

1
Department of Laboratory Medicine and Immunology Program, University of California, San Francisco, California, USA.
2
Department of Laboratory Medicine and Immunology Program, University of California, San Francisco, California, USA clifford.lowell@ucsf.edu.

Abstract

The motheaten mouse was first described in 1975 as a model of systemic inflammation and autoimmunity, as a result of immune system dysregulation. The phenotype was later ascribed to mutations in the cytoplasmic tyrosine phosphatase Shp1. This phosphatase is expressed widely throughout the hematopoietic system and has been shown to impact a multitude of cell signaling pathways. The determination of which cell types contribute to the different aspects of the phenotype caused by global Shp1 loss or mutation and which pathways within these cell types are regulated by Shp1 is important to further our understanding of immune system regulation. In this review, we focus on the role of Shp1 in myeloid cells and how its dysregulation affects immune function, which can impact human disease.

KEYWORDS:

Ptpn6; autoimmunity; inflammation; motheaten; tyrosine phosphatase

PMID:
28606940
PMCID:
PMC5557645
DOI:
10.1189/jlb.2MR0317-105R
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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