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Clin Breast Cancer. 2017 May 19. pii: S1526-8209(16)30357-3. doi: 10.1016/j.clbc.2017.05.003. [Epub ahead of print]

Physical Exercise Positively Influences Breast Cancer Evolution.

Author information

1
Department of Experimental Physiology, Medical School, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece.
2
Department of Experimental Physiology, Medical School, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece. Electronic address: tfilipou@med/uoa.gr.

Abstract

Breast cancer is one of the most commonly diagnosed types of cancer in women. Its pathogenesis involves genetic, hormonal, and environmental factors. A large body of evidence indicates that physical activity has positive effects on every aspect of breast cancer evolution, including prevention, medical treatment, and aftercare clinical settings. Thus, different types of exercise can influence the prevention and progression of the disease through several common mechanisms, such as reduction of insulin resistance and improvement of immunity and cardiovascular function. Furthermore, acute and chronic symptoms of breast cancer, such as cachexia, muscle mass loss, fatigue, cardiotoxicity, weight gain, hormone alterations, bone loss, and psychologic adverse effects, may all be favorably influenced by regular exercise. We review the relation of intensity and duration of exercise with potential pathophysiologic pathways, including obesity-related hormones and sex steroid hormone production, oxidative stress, epigenetic alterations such as DNA hypomethylation, and changes in telomere length, within the context of the beneficial effects of exercise. The potential role of exercise in reducing the intensity of the adverse effects that result from breast cancer and anticancer treatment is also discussed.

KEYWORDS:

Adiposity; Breast cancer survivors; Exercise training; Hormones; Inflammation; Physical activity

PMID:
28606800
DOI:
10.1016/j.clbc.2017.05.003
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