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BMC Public Health. 2017 Jun 12;17(1):569. doi: 10.1186/s12889-017-4464-8.

Neighborhood educational disparities in active commuting among women: the effect of distance between the place of residence and the place of work/study (an ACTI-Cités study).

Author information

1
CRNH Rhône-Alpes, Pierre Benite, France.
2
CARMEN INSERM U060/University of Lyon1/INRA U1235, Oullins, France.
3
CENS, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Pierre Benite, France.
4
Department of Family Medicine and Public Health & Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California, 9500 Gilman Drive, San Diego, La Jolla, 92093, CA, USA.
5
Paris-Est University, Labex Futurs Urbains, Marne-la-Vallée, France.
6
Department of Geography, LADYSS, Paris 8 University, Paris, France.
7
Université Paris 13, Sorbonne Paris Cité - EREN (Equipe de Recherche en Epidémiologie Nutritionnelle), U1153 Inserm, Inra, Cnam, Centre de Recherche en Epidémiologie et Biostatistiques; CRNH IdF, Bobigny, France.
8
Laboratoire Image, Ville et Environnement, Université de Strasbourg, Strasbourg, France.
9
Paris-Est University, Department of Geography, Lab-Urba, Créteil, France.
10
Université Pierre et Marie Curie-Paris 6, Dept of Nutrition Pitié-Salpêtrière Hospital (AP-HP), Institute of Cardiometabolism and Nutrition (ICAN), Paris, France.
11
CRNH Rhône-Alpes, Pierre Benite, France. chantal.simon@univ-lyon1.fr.
12
CARMEN INSERM U060/University of Lyon1/INRA U1235, Oullins, France. chantal.simon@univ-lyon1.fr.
13
CENS, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Pierre Benite, France. chantal.simon@univ-lyon1.fr.
14
Service d'Endocrinologie, Diabète, Nutrition Centre Hospitalier Lyon Sud, 165 Chemin du Grand Revoyet, F69310, Pierre-Bénite, France. chantal.simon@univ-lyon1.fr.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Active transportation has been associated with favorable health outcomes. Previous research highlighted the influence of neighborhood educational level on active transportation. However, little is known regarding the effect of commuting distance on social disparities in active commuting. In this regard, women have been poorly studied. The objective of this paper was to evaluate the relationship between neighborhood educational level and active commuting, and to assess whether the commuting distance modifies this relationship in adult women.

METHODS:

This cross-sectional study is based on a subsample of women from the Nutrinet-Santé web-cohort (N = 1169). Binomial, log-binomial and negative binomial regressions were used to assess the associations between neighborhood education level and (i) the likelihood of reporting any active commuting time, and (ii) the share of commuting time made by active transportation modes. Potential effect measure modification of distance to work on the previous associations was assessed both on the additive and the multiplicative scales.

RESULTS:

Neighborhood education level was positively associated with the probability of reporting any active commuting time (relative risk = 1.774; p < 0.05) and the share of commuting time spent active (relative risk = 1.423; p < 0.05). The impact of neighborhood education was greater at long distances to work for both outcomes.

CONCLUSIONS:

Our results suggest that neighborhood educational disparities in active commuting tend to increase with commuting distance among women. Further research is needed to provide geographically driven guidance for health promotion intervention aiming at reducing disparities in active transportation among socioeconomic groups.

KEYWORDS:

Active commuting; Distance to work; Effect measure modification; Neighborhood education; Social environment

PMID:
28606118
PMCID:
PMC5469012
DOI:
10.1186/s12889-017-4464-8
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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