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Compr Psychiatry. 2017 Aug;77:38-44. doi: 10.1016/j.comppsych.2017.05.007. Epub 2017 Jun 3.

Factors associated with posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms among community volunteers during the Sewol ferry disaster in Korea.

Author information

1
Department of Psychiatry, Chonnam National University Medical School, Gwangju, Republic of Korea.
2
Department of Psychiatry, Chonnam National University Medical School, Gwangju, Republic of Korea. Electronic address: swkim@chonnam.ac.kr.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The aim of this study was to investigate the characteristics associated with volunteerism and identify the factors that contributed to posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms among community volunteers following the Sewol ferry disaster in Korea.

METHODS:

In total, 2,298 adults (aged 30-70 years) from the Jin-do area, where the Sewol ferry disaster occurred, participated in this study. A cross-sectional survey was conducted 1 month after the disaster. Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), depression, and anxiety symptoms were assessed using the Impact of Events Scale Revised (IES-R), Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D), and Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI).

RESULTS:

Clinically relevant PTSD symptoms were observed in 151 (19.7%) community volunteers. Age, education, socioeconomic status, religion, and lifetime experiences of natural disasters were associated with volunteering following the disaster. Logistic regression analysis revealed that volunteering was a significant risk factor for the development of PTSD symptoms in this sample. Personal experience with property damage associated with a traumatic event, depression, and anxiety were also significantly associated with the PTSD symptoms of community volunteers.

CONCLUSIONS:

Our results suggest the need for assessment and mental health programs for community volunteers performing rescue work to prevent posttraumatic stress symptoms following a community disaster.

PMID:
28605622
DOI:
10.1016/j.comppsych.2017.05.007
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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