Format

Send to

Choose Destination
JAMA Intern Med. 2017 Sep 1;177(9):1308-1315. doi: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2017.1938.

Association of Adverse Events With Antibiotic Use in Hospitalized Patients.

Author information

1
Division of Pediatric Infectious Diseases, Department of Pediatrics, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland.
2
Department of Pharmacy, Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland.
3
Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland.

Abstract

Importance:

Estimates of the incidence of overall antibiotic-associated adverse drug events (ADEs) in hospitalized patients are generally unavailable.

Objective:

To describe the incidence of antibiotic-associated ADEs for adult inpatients receiving systemic antibiotic therapy.

Design, Setting, and Participants:

Retrospective cohort of adult inpatients admitted to general medicine wards at an academic medical center.

Exposures:

At least 24 hours of any parenteral or oral antibiotic therapy.

Main Outcomes and Measures:

Medical records of 1488 patients were examined for 30 days after antibiotic initiation for the development of the following antibiotic-associated ADEs: gastrointestinal, dermatologic, musculoskeletal, hematologic, hepatobiliary, renal, cardiac, and neurologic; and 90 days for the development of Clostridium difficile infection or incident multidrug-resistant organism infection, based on adjudication by 2 infectious diseases trained clinicians.

Results:

In 1488 patients, the median age was 59 years (interquartile range, 49-69 years), and 758 (51%) participants were female. A total of 298 (20%) patients experienced at least 1 antibiotic-associated ADE. Furthermore, 56 (20%) non-clinically indicated antibiotic regimens were associated with an ADE, including 7 cases of C difficile infection. Every additional 10 days of antibiotic therapy conferred a 3% increased risk of an ADE. The most common ADEs were gastrointestinal, renal, and hematologic abnormalities, accounting for 78 (42%), 45 (24%), and 28 (15%) 30-day ADEs, respectively. Notable differences were identified between the incidence of ADEs associated with specific antibiotics.

Conclusions and Relevance:

Although antibiotics may play a critical role when used appropriately, our findings underscore the importance of judicious antibiotic prescribing to reduce the harm that can result from antibiotic-associated ADEs.

PMID:
28604925
PMCID:
PMC5710569
DOI:
10.1001/jamainternmed.2017.1938
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Silverchair Information Systems Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center