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Mol Phylogenet Evol. 2017 Sep;114:82-92. doi: 10.1016/j.ympev.2017.05.019. Epub 2017 Jun 8.

Canine parvovirus type 2 (CPV-2) and Feline panleukopenia virus (FPV) codon bias analysis reveals a progressive adaptation to the new niche after the host jump.

Author information

1
University of Padua, Legnaro, PD, Italy. Electronic address: giovanni.franzo@unipd.it.
2
University of Padua, Legnaro, PD, Italy.

Abstract

Based on virus dependence from host cell machinery, their codon usage is expected to show a strong relation with the host one. Even if this association has been stated, especially for bacteria viruses, the linkage is considered to be less consistent for more complex organisms and a codon bias adaptation after host jump has never been proven. Canine parvovirus type 2 (CPV-2) was selected as a model because it represents a well characterized case of host jump, originating from Feline panleukopenia virus (FPV). The current study demonstrates that the adaptation to specific tissue and host codon bias affected CPV-2 evolution. Remarkably, FPV and CPV-2 showed a higher closeness toward the codon bias of the tissues they display the higher tropism for. Moreover, after the host jump, a clear and significant trend was evidenced toward a reduction in the distance between CPV-2 and the dog codon bias over time. This evidence was not confirmed for FPV, suggesting that an equilibrium has been reached during the prolonged virus-host co-evolution. Additionally, the presence of an intermediate pattern displayed by some strains infecting wild species suggests that these could have facilitated the host switch also by acting on codon bias.

KEYWORDS:

Canine parvovirus type 2; Codon bias; Evolution over time; Feline parvovirus; Tissue adaptation

PMID:
28603036
DOI:
10.1016/j.ympev.2017.05.019
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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