Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Transfus Apher Sci. 2017 Jun;56(3):287-290. doi: 10.1016/j.transci.2017.05.014. Epub 2017 May 26.

Red blood cell transfusion and outcome in cancer.

Author information

1
Saskatoon Cancer Centre, Saskatoon, SK, Canada; College of Medicine, University of Saskatchewan, SK, Canada.
2
Saskatoon Cancer Centre, Saskatoon, SK, Canada.
3
Human Protein Process Sciences, Aubers, France.
4
Graduate Institute of Biological Materials and Tissue Engineering, College of Biomedical Engineering, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan; International PhD Program in Biomedical Engineering, College of Biomedical Engineering, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan. Electronic address: thburnouf@gmail.com.
5
International Consultancy in Blood Components Quality/Safety Improvement, Audit/Inspection and DDR Strategies, London, UK. Electronic address: jseghatchian@btopenworld.com.
6
Saskatoon Cancer Centre, Saskatoon, SK, Canada; College of Medicine, University of Saskatchewan, SK, Canada. Electronic address: hadi.goubranmessiha@saskcancer.ca.

Abstract

Oncology services utilize about 15% of the blood transfusion resources in the USA. Red blood cell transfusion is performed immediately before, during or after major surgery to compensate for blood loss and hemodilution. However, a lack of evidence-based guidelines leads to variable transfusion practices among clinicians. The benefits of transfusing blood products are obvious in life-threatening low blood cell counts or bleeding, but it is becoming apparent that deliberate blood transfusion in some cancer patients can trigger negative clinical impacts. This review attempts to provide an overview of the impact of red blood cell transfusion in patients suffering from various types of oncologic pathologies.

KEYWORDS:

Cancer; Prognosis; Recurrence; Red blood cells; Transfusion

PMID:
28602484
DOI:
10.1016/j.transci.2017.05.014
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center