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Obesity (Silver Spring). 2017 Jun 10. doi: 10.1002/oby.21889. [Epub ahead of print]

The dietary intervention to enhance tracking with mobile devices (DIET Mobile) study: A 6-month randomized weight loss trial.

Author information

1
Department of Health Promotion, Education, and Behavior, Arnold School of Public Health, University of South Carolina, Columbia, South Carolina, USA.
2
Department of Exercise Science, Prevention Research Center, Arnold School of Public Health, University of South Carolina, Columbia, South Carolina, USA.
3
Prevention Research Center, Arnold School of Public Health, University of South Carolina, Columbia, South Carolina, USA.
4
Department of Psychology, Clemson University, Clemson, South Carolina, USA.
5
Holcombe Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Clemson University, Clemson, South Carolina, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To examine the use of two different mobile dietary self-monitoring methods for weight loss.

METHODS:

Adults with overweight (n = 81; mean BMI 34.7 ± 5.6 kg/m2 ) were randomized to self-monitor their diet with a mobile app (App, n = 42) or wearable Bite Counter device (Bite, n = 39). Both groups received the same behavioral weight loss information via twice-weekly podcasts. Weight, physical activity (International Physical Activity Questionnaire), and energy intake (two dietary recalls) were assessed at 0, 3, and 6 months.

RESULTS:

At 6 months, 75% of participants completed the trial. The App group lost significantly more weight (-6.8 ± 0.8 kg) than the Bite group (-3.0 ± 0.8 kg; group × time interaction: P < 0.001). Changes in energy intake (kcal/d) (-621 ± 157 App, -456 ± 167 Bite; P = 0.47) or number of days diet was tracked (90.7 ± 9.1 App, 68.4 ± 9.8 Bite; P = 0.09) did not differ between groups, but the Bite group had significant increases in physical activity metabolic equivalents (+2015.4 ± 684.6 min/wk; P = 0.02) compared to little change in the App group (-136.5 ± 630.6; P = 0.02). Total weight loss was significantly correlated with number of podcasts downloaded (r = -0.33, P < 0.01) and number of days diet was tracked (r = -0.33, P < 0.01).

CONCLUSIONS:

While frequency of diet tracking was similar between the App and Bite groups, there was greater weight loss observed in the App group.

PMID:
28600833
DOI:
10.1002/oby.21889
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