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Blood. 2017 Jul 27;130(4):460-465. doi: 10.1182/blood-2017-01-734558. Epub 2017 Jun 9.

Ethical considerations in genomic testing for hematologic disorders.

Marron JM1,2,3,4, Joffe S5,6,7.

Author information

1
Department of Pediatric Oncology, Dana-Farber/Boston Children's Cancer and Blood Disorders Center, Boston, MA.
2
Division of Population Sciences, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA.
3
Center for Bioethics and.
4
Department of Pediatrics, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA.
5
Department of Medical Ethics and Health Policy, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA.
6
Division of Oncology, The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA; and.
7
Leonard Davis Institute for Health Economics, Philadelphia, PA.

Abstract

As our technological capacities improve, genomic testing is increasingly integrating into patient care. The field of clinical hematology is no exception. Genomic testing carries great promise, but several ethical issues must be considered whenever such testing is performed. This review addresses these ethical considerations, including issues surrounding informed consent and the uncertainty of the results of genomic testing; the challenge of incidental findings; and possible inequities in access to and benefit from such testing. Genomic testing is likely to transform the practice of both benign and malignant hematology, but clinicians must carefully consider these core ethical issues in order to make the most of this exciting and evolving technology.

PMID:
28600340
PMCID:
PMC5533200
DOI:
10.1182/blood-2017-01-734558
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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