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Drug Alcohol Depend. 2017 Aug 1;177:124-129. doi: 10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2017.03.038. Epub 2017 May 29.

Long-term recall of social relationships related to addiction and HIV risk behaviors.

Author information

1
Decision Sciences Institute/PIRE, 1005 Main St., Pawtucket, RI 02860-7802, USA. Electronic address: stout@pire.org.
2
Decision Sciences Institute/PIRE, 1005 Main St., Pawtucket, RI 02860-7802, USA; Center for Alcohol and Addiction Studies, Brown University School of Public Health, Providence, RI 02912, USA.
3
Decision Sciences Institute/PIRE, 1005 Main St., Pawtucket, RI 02860-7802, USA; Center for Health Policy and Health Services Research, Henry Ford Health System, One Ford Place, Suite 3A, Detroit, MI, 48202, USA.
4
Decision Sciences Institute/PIRE, 1005 Main St., Pawtucket, RI 02860-7802, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Social relationships have been demonstrated as a key predictor of relapse among addicted persons and are likely to be important determinants of HIV risk behaviors also. However, the degree to which this population can reliably and consistently identify important people (IPs) in retrospect has been understudied.

METHODS:

Using the modified Important People and Activities questionnaire, we investigated to what degree IPs were dropped, added, or retained, and whether data about individual IPs were reported accurately on 6- and 12-month follow up periods using a sample of 50 drug or alcohol abusing participants.

RESULTS:

We found that IPs were largely retained, and that those retained versus dropped/added differed by their reaction to participant alcohol/drug use, as well as frequency of contact. We further found that there were differences in reliability of data describing specific IPs. While both 6- and 12-month follow up periods led to reliabilities ranging from excellent to fair, we found poorer reliability on responses to recall of "frequency of contact" and "reactions to drinking", as well as "reactions to drug use".

CONCLUSION:

Future investigations of reliability of social relationships recalled retrospectively should attempt to examine possible systematic biases in addition to the reliability of specific IP data. More sophisticated studies are needed on factors associated with systematic variation in reporting of aspects of social relationships that are associated with addictions or HIV risk outcomes.

KEYWORDS:

Addiction; Important people; Reactions to substance use; Recovery; Reliability; Social influence

PMID:
28599210
PMCID:
PMC5624203
DOI:
10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2017.03.038
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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