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Nutrients. 2017 Jun 9;9(6). pii: E589. doi: 10.3390/nu9060589.

Cognitive Performance Enhancement Induced by Caffeine, Carbohydrate and Guarana Mouth Rinsing during Submaximal Exercise.

Author information

1
Laboratoire Motricité Humaine Expertise Sport Santé, Université Nice Sophia Antipolis, 06205 Nice, France. laurapomportes@hotmail.fr.
2
CREPS PACA, 13080 Aix-en-Provence, France. laurapomportes@hotmail.fr.
3
Laboratoire Motricité Humaine Expertise Sport Santé, Université Nice Sophia Antipolis, 06205 Nice, France. brisswalter@unice.fr.
4
Laboratoire de Neurosciences Cognitives, Aix-Marseille Université, CNRS, LNC, 13331 Marseille, France. laurence.casini@univ-amu.fr.
5
Institut des Sciences du Mouvement, Aix-Marseille Université, UMR 7287, 13288 Marseille, France. arnaud.hays@gmail.com.
6
Laboratoire de Psychologie Cognitive, Aix-Marseille Université, CNRS, LPC, 13331 Marseille, France. karen.davranche@univ-amu.fr.

Abstract

The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of serial mouth rinsing (MR) with nutritional supplements on cognitive performance (i.e., cognitive control and time perception) during a 40-min submaximal exercise. Twenty-four participants completed 4 counterbalanced experimental sessions, during which they performed MR with either placebo (PL), carbohydrate (CHO: 1.6 g/25 mL), guarana complex (GUAc: 0.4 g/25 mL) or caffeine (CAF: 67 mg/25 mL) before and twice during exercise. The present study provided some important new insights regarding the specific changes in cognitive performance induced by nutritional supplements. The main results were: (1) CHO, CAF and GUA MR likely led participants to improve temporal performance; (2) CAF MR likely improved cognitive control; and (3) CHO MR led to a likely decrease in subjective perception of effort at the end of the exercise compared to PL, GUA and CAF. Moreover, results have shown that performing 40-min submaximal exercise enhances information processing in terms of both speed and accuracy, improves temporal performance and does not alter cognitive control. The present study opens up new perspectives regarding the use of MR to optimize cognitive performance during physical exercise.

KEYWORDS:

cognition; conflict task; mouth rinse; nutrition; perceived exertion; time-perception task

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