Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Oncologist. 2017 Sep;22(9):1117-1124. doi: 10.1634/theoncologist.2017-0047. Epub 2017 Jun 8.

Reducing Uncertainty: Predictors of Stopping Chemotherapy Early and Shortened Survival Time in Platinum Resistant/Refractory Ovarian Cancer-The GCIG Symptom Benefit Study.

Author information

1
NHMRC Clinical Trials Centre, University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia felicia.roncolato@ctc.usyd.edu.au.
2
Australia New Zealand Gynaecological Oncology Group (ANZGOG), New South Wales, Australia.
3
Macarthur Cancer Therapy Centre, New South Wales, Australia.
4
Centre Francois Baclesse, Caen, France.
5
NHMRC Clinical Trials Centre, University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia.
6
University College London, London, England.
7
Klinik fur Gynakologie und Geburtshilfe, UKSH, Kiel, Germany.
8
The Jikei University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan.
9
Kitasato Academic Research Organization, Tokyo, Japan.
10
Istituto Nazionale per lo Studio e la Cura dei Tumori - Fondazione G. Pascale, IRCCS, Napoli (MITO), Italy.
11
Cancer Trials Ireland, Galway University Hospital, Galway, Ireland.
12
Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
13
Department of Oncology, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
14
Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
15
Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
16
Stanford Comprehensive Cancer Institute, Stanford, California, USA.
17
AGO Study group and Department of Gynecology & Gynecologic Oncology, Kliniken Essen Mitte (KEM), Essen, Germany.
18
Cancer Research UK & UCL Cancer Trials Centre, London, England.
19
ICO Centre René Gauducheau, Saint Herblain, France.
20
Psycho-oncology Research Group (PoCoG), School of Psychology and Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia.
21
Prince of Wales Hospital, Sydney, Australia.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Clinicians and patients often overestimate the benefits of chemotherapy, and overall survival (OS), in platinum resistant/refractory ovarian cancer (PRROC). This study sought to determine aspects of health-related quality of life and clinicopathological characteristics before starting chemotherapy that were associated with stopping chemotherapy early, shortened survival, and death within 30 days of chemotherapy.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

This study enrolled women with PRROC before starting palliative chemotherapy. Health-related quality of life was measured with EORTC QLQ-C30/QLQ-OV28. Chemotherapy stopped within 8 weeks of starting was defined as stopping early. Logistic regression was used to assess univariable and multivariable associations with stopping chemotherapy early and death within 30 days of chemotherapy; Cox proportional hazards regression was used to assess associations with progression-free and OS.

RESULTS:

Low baseline global health status (GHS), role function (RF), physical function (PF), and high abdominal/gastrointestinal symptom (AGIS) were associated with stopping chemotherapy early (all p < .007); low PF and RF remained significant after adjusting for clinicopathological factors (both p < .0401). Most who stopped chemotherapy early had Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group Performance Score 0-1 at baseline (79%); PF, RF, and GHS remained independently significant predictors of stopping chemotherapy early in this subgroup. Death within 30 days of chemotherapy occurred in 14%. Low GHS, RF, and PF remained significantly associated with death within 30 days of chemotherapy after adjusting for clinicopathological factors (all p < .012).

CONCLUSION:

Women with low GHS, RF, or PF before starting chemotherapy were more likely to stop chemotherapy early, with short OS. Self-ratings of GHS, RF, and PF could improve patient-clinician communication regarding prognosis and help decision-making in women considering chemotherapy for PRROC.

IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE:

Measuring aspects of health-related quality of life when considering further chemotherapy in platinum resistant/refractory ovarian cancer (PRROC) could help identify women with a particularly poor prognosis who are unlikely to benefit from chemotherapy and could therefore be spared unnecessary treatment and toxicity in their last months of life. Self-ratings of global health status, role function, and physical function could improve patient-clinician communication regarding prognosis and help decision-making in women considering chemotherapy for PRROC.

KEYWORDS:

Patient‐reported outcomes; Platinum‐resistant ovarian cancer; Prognosis; Quality of life

PMID:
28596446
PMCID:
PMC5599194
DOI:
10.1634/theoncologist.2017-0047
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for HighWire Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center