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J Surg Res. 2017 Sep;217:63-74. doi: 10.1016/j.jss.2017.04.032. Epub 2017 May 5.

Adipose-derived stem cells seeded in Pluronic F-127 hydrogel promotes diabetic wound healing.

Author information

1
Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, The Third Affiliated Hospital of Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, China.
2
Faculty of Health Sciences, Macao University, Macao, China.
3
Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, The Third Affiliated Hospital of Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, China; Sansom Institute for Health Research, School of Pharmacy and Medical Sciences, University of South Australia, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia.
4
Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, The Third Affiliated Hospital of Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, China. Electronic address: shenjiedr@163.com.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Chronic nonhealing wound is a multifactorial complication of diabetes that results specifically as a consequence of impaired angiogenesis and currently lacks in effective treatments. Although a stem cell-based therapy may provide a novel treatment to augment diabetic wound healing, inferior cell survival at the diabetic skin wound is one of the key causes that are responsible for the low efficacy of the stem cell therapy.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

In this work, we used an injectable, biocompatible, and thermosensitive hydrogel Pluronic F-127 to encapsulate allogeneic nondiabetic adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) and topically applied the cells to a full-thickness cutaneous wound in the streptozotocin-induced diabetic model in rats.

RESULTS:

The cells seeded in the hydrogel enhanced angiogenesis (CD31 marker) and promoted the cell proliferation (Ki67 marker) at the wound site and significantly accelerated wound closure, which was accompanied by facilitated regeneration of granulation tissue. Consistently, levels of the messenger RNA expression of key angiogenesis growth factor, vascular endothelial growth factor, and key wound healing growth factor, transforming growth factor beta 1, were also upregulated in the cell-treated wounds when compared with untreated wounds.

CONCLUSIONS:

The results indicated that the transplantation of allogeneic ADSCs via the hydrogel improves the efficiency of cell delivery and optimizes the performance of ADSCs for augmenting diabetic wound healing. In conclusion, this ADSC-based therapy may provide a novel therapeutic strategy for the treatment of nonhealing diabetic foot ulcers.

KEYWORDS:

Adipose-derived stem cells; Angiogenesis; Hydrogel; Wound healing

PMID:
28595815
DOI:
10.1016/j.jss.2017.04.032
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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