Format

Send to

Choose Destination
BMC Res Notes. 2017 Jun 8;10(1):197. doi: 10.1186/s13104-017-2521-0.

Prevalence and risk factors of poor immune recovery among adult HIV patients attending care and treatment centre in northwestern Tanzania following the use of highly active antiretroviral therapy: a retrospective study.

Author information

1
Department of Medicine, Weill Bugando School of Medicine, 1464, Mwanza, Tanzania. daniel_rev2002@yahoo.com.
2
Department of Medicine, Weill Bugando School of Medicine, 1464, Mwanza, Tanzania.
3
Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Weill Bugando School of Medicine, 1464, Mwanza, Tanzania.
4
Care and Treatment Center, Sekouture Regional Referral Hospital, 132, Mwanza, Tanzania.
5
Department of Medicine, University of Dodoma, School of Medicine, 395, Dodoma, Tanzania.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Highly Active Antiretroviral therapy (HAART) reverses the effect of Human Immunodeficiency Virus/Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (HIV/AIDS) by durably suppressing viral replication. This allows CD4 gain to levels that are adequate enough to restore the body's capability to fight against opportunistic infections (OIs). Patients with poor immune recovery have been shown to have higher risk of developing both AIDS and non AIDS related clinical events. This study aimed at assessing the proportions and risk factors of poor immune recovery in adult HIV-infected patients on 48 months of HAART attending care and treatment center (CTC) in northwestern Tanzania.

METHODS:

A retrospective analysis of adult HIV patients' data attending CTC at Sekou Toure hospital and who initiated HAART between February 2004 and January 2008 was done. Poor immune recovery was defined as a CD4 count less than 350 cells/µl on follow up as used in other studies.

RESULTS:

A total of 734 patients were included in the study. In this study 50.25% of patients attending CTC at Sekou Toure hospital were found to have poor immune recovery. The risk of developing inadequate immune recovery was independently associated with male gender, age older than 50 years, low baseline CD4 counts, and advanced World Health Organization (WHO) clinical stage.

CONCLUSIONS:

Poor immune recovery is prevalent among adult HIV patients attending CTC at Sekou Toure hospital in Northwestern part of Tanzania and opportunistic infections are common in this sub group of patients. Clinicians in resource limited countries need to identify these patients timely and plan them for targeted viral assessment and close clinical follow up to improve their long term clinical outcome.

KEYWORDS:

Antiretroviral therapy; HIV; Immune recovery; Northwestern Tanzania

PMID:
28595630
PMCID:
PMC5465538
DOI:
10.1186/s13104-017-2521-0
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for BioMed Central Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center