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Sci Rep. 2017 Jun 7;7(1):2962. doi: 10.1038/s41598-017-03104-1.

Human cortical activity evoked by contextual processing in attentional orienting.

Author information

1
Faculty of Human Health Sciences, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto, 606-8507, Japan.
2
International Research Fellow of the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science, Tokyo, 102-0083, Japan.
3
Organization for Promoting Neurodevelopmental Disorder Research, Kyoto, 606-8392, Japan.
4
School of Biomedical Engineering, Capital Medical University, Beijing, 100069, China. lichunlin1981@163.com.
5
Department of Neurodevelopmental Psychiatry, Habilitation and Rehabilitation, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto, 606-8507, Japan.
6
Faculty of Human Health Sciences, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto, 606-8507, Japan. toichi.motomi.4v@kyoto-u.ac.jp.
7
Organization for Promoting Neurodevelopmental Disorder Research, Kyoto, 606-8392, Japan. toichi.motomi.4v@kyoto-u.ac.jp.

Abstract

The ability to assess another person's direction of attention is paramount in social communication, many studies have reported a similar pattern between gaze and arrow cues in attention orienting. Neuroimaging research has also demonstrated no qualitative differences in attention to gaze and arrow cues. However, these studies were implemented under simple experiment conditions. Researchers have highlighted the importance of contextual processing (i.e., the semantic congruence between cue and target) in attentional orienting, showing that attentional orienting by social gaze or arrow cues could be modulated through contextual processing. Here, we examine the neural activity of attentional orienting by gaze and arrow cues in response to contextual processing using functional magnetic resonance imaging. The results demonstrated that the influence of neural activity through contextual processing to attentional orienting occurred under invalid conditions (when the cue and target were incongruent versus congruent) in the ventral frontoparietal network, although we did not identify any differences in the neural substrates of attentional orienting in contextual processing between gaze and arrow cues. These results support behavioural data of attentional orienting modulated by contextual processing based on the neurocognitive architecture.

PMID:
28592863
PMCID:
PMC5462779
DOI:
10.1038/s41598-017-03104-1
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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