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J Nutr. 2017 Jul;147(7):1374-1383. doi: 10.3945/jn.117.249060. Epub 2017 Jun 7.

A Western Diet Pattern Is Associated with Higher Concentrations of Blood and Bone Lead among Middle-Aged and Elderly Men.

Author information

1
Departments of Epidemiology and.
2
Department of Clinical Laboratory and Nutritional Sciences, University of Massachusetts at Lowell, Lowell, MA.
3
Department of Environmental Health, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA.
4
Normative Aging Study, Veterans Affairs Boston Healthcare System, Boston, MA.
5
Department of Medicine, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA; and.
6
Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON.
7
Departments of Epidemiology and sungkyun@umich.edu.
8
Department of Environmental Health Sciences, School of Public Health, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI.

Abstract

Background: Little is known about the effects of overall dietary pattern on lead concentration.Objective: We examined the association of overall dietary patterns, derived from a semiquantitative food frequency questionnaire, with bone and blood lead concentrations.Methods: These longitudinal analyses included mostly non-Hispanic white, middle-aged-to-elderly men from the Veterans Affairs Normative Aging Study. Long-term lead exposures were measured as tibia and patella lead concentrations by using K-shell-X-ray fluorescence. Short-term lead exposures were measured as blood lead concentrations by using graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy. Dietary pattern scores were derived by using factor analysis. Linear mixed-effects models were utilized to predict blood lead concentrations among 983 men, aged 44-92 y at baseline, with a total of 3273 observations (during 1987-2008). We constructed linear regression models to determine the relations between dietary patterns and bone lead concentrations among 649 participants with an age range of 49-93 y.Results: Two major dietary patterns were identified: a prudent dietary pattern, characterized by high intakes of fruit, legumes, vegetables, whole grains, poultry, and seafood; and a Western dietary pattern, characterized by high intakes of processed meat, red meat, refined grains, high-fat dairy products, French fries, butter, and eggs. After adjusting for age, smoking status, body mass index, total energy intake, education, occupation, neighborhood-based education and income level, men in the highest tertile of the Western pattern score (compared with the lowest) had 0.91 μg/dL (95% CI: 0.41, 1.42 μg/dL) higher blood lead, 5.96 μg/g (95% CI: 1.76, 10.16 μg/g) higher patella lead, and 3.83 μg/g (95% CI: 0.97, 6.70 μg/g) higher tibia lead. No significant association was detected with the prudent dietary pattern in the adjusted model.Conclusions: These findings suggest that the Western diet is associated with a greater lead body burden among the middle-aged-to-elderly men. More studies are needed to examine the underlying mechanisms by which dietary patterns are associated with lead concentrations.

KEYWORDS:

Normative Aging Study; blood lead concentrations; bone lead concentrations; dietary patterns; elderly men; patella lead; tibia lead

PMID:
28592514
PMCID:
PMC5483966
DOI:
10.3945/jn.117.249060
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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