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Sex Health. 2017 Aug;14(4):363-371. doi: 10.1071/SH16034.

Prevalence and correlates of condom use among sexually active men who have sex with men in the United States: findings from the National Survey of Family Growth, 2002, 2006-10 and 2011-13.

Author information

1
Division of HIV/AIDS Prevention, National Center for HIV, Hepatitis, STD and TB Prevention, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, MS G-37, Atlanta, GA 30333, USA.
2
ICF International at the Division of HIV/AIDS Prevention, National Center for HIV, Hepatitis, STD and TB Prevention, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, MS G-37, Atlanta, GA 30333, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Men who have sex with men (MSM) are disproportionately at risk of contracting HIV and other sexually transmissible infections (STIs). Correct and consistent condom use is the most effective method to prevent HIV and other STIs among sexually active MSM.

METHODS:

Using data from the 2002, 2006-10, 2011-13 cycles of the National Survey of Family Growth (NSFG), the overall prevalence of condom use at last sex and by sexual risk behaviours (sex with ≥2 same-sex partners, sex with ≥2 opposite sex partners, sex with a person who injects drugs, sex with an HIV-positive person and exchanged sex for money or drugs) among sexually active MSM (reported oral or anal sex with a male in the preceding 12 months) was estimated. The association between condom use at last sex and demographic and sexual behaviour variables was also evaluated.

RESULTS:

Approximately 31% of all respondents (n=618; weighted n=1596702) reported condom use at last sex. Among MSM who reported ≥1 sexual risk behaviour in the past year, prevalence of condom use at last sex ranged from 30 to 38%. After adjusting for covariates, Hispanic MSM [adjusted prevalence ratio (APR)=1.81, 95%CI=1.27-2.58] were more likely than White MSM to report condom use at last sex; MSM with a recently diagnosed STI (APR=1.71, 95%CI=1.04-2.80) were more likely than MSM without a recently diagnosed STI to report condom use at last sex; and married or cohabitating MSM (APR=0.29, 95%CI=0.13-0.66) were less likely than unmarried and not cohabitating MSM to report condom use at last sex. There was no difference in temporal trends in condom use at last sex across the three NSFG cycles [2002 (33.8%); 2006-10 (25.6%); 2011-13 (40.6%), P=0.926].

CONCLUSIONS:

This study data suggest that prevalence of condom use among MSM is low, even among MSM who report sexual risk behaviours. The continued promotion of consistent condom use as an effective primary HIV/STI risk-reduction strategy is important because it mitigates HIV and STI risk and also complements the effectiveness of newer HIV prevention approaches such as pre-exposure prophylaxis.

PMID:
28591549
DOI:
10.1071/SH16034
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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