Format

Send to

Choose Destination
PLoS One. 2017 Jun 7;12(6):e0178980. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0178980. eCollection 2017.

Physical education policy compliance and Latino children's fitness: Does the association vary by school neighborhood socioeconomic advantage?

Author information

1
Health Education Department and Health Equity Institute, San Francisco State University; Center on Social Disparities in Health, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California, United States of America.
2
Family Community Medicine, Center on Social Disparities in Health, University of California San Francisco School of Medicine, San Francisco, California, United States of America.
3
Stanford Prevention Research Center, Program on Prevention Outcomes and Practices, Palo Alto, California, United States of America.
4
Center for Social Epidemiology and Population Health, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, United States of America.
5
Department of Biostatistics, School of Public Health, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, United States of America.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To investigate the contribution of school neighborhood socioeconomic advantage to the association between school-district physical education policy compliance in California public schools and Latino students' physical fitness.

METHODS:

Cross-sectional Fitnessgram data for public-school students were linked with school- and district-level information, district-level physical education policy compliance from 2004-2005 and 2005-2006, and 2000 United States Census data. Multilevel logistic regression models examined whether income and education levels in school neighborhoods moderated the effects of district-level physical education policy compliance on Latino fifth-graders' fitness levels.

RESULTS:

Physical education compliance data were available for 48 California school districts, which included 64,073 Latino fifth-graders. Fewer than half (23, or 46%) of these districts were found to be in compliance, and only 16% of Latino fifth-graders attended schools in compliant districts. Overall, there was a positive association between district compliance with physical education policy and fitness (OR, 95%CI: 1.38, 1.07, 1.78) adjusted for covariates. There was no significant interaction between school neighborhood socioeconomic advantage and physical education policy compliance (p>.05): there was a positive pattern in the association between school district compliance with physical education policy and student fitness levels across levels of socioeconomic advantage, though the association was not always significant.

CONCLUSIONS:

Across neighborhoods with varying levels of socioeconomic advantage, increasing physical education policy compliance in elementary schools may be an effective strategy for improving fitness among Latino children.

PMID:
28591139
PMCID:
PMC5462408
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0178980
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Public Library of Science Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center