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Support Care Cancer. 2017 Jun 7. doi: 10.1007/s00520-017-3774-9. [Epub ahead of print]

Needs assessment of primary care physicians in the management of chronic pain in cancer survivors.

Author information

1
Odette Cancer Centre, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
2
Medical Director Wellness Institute, Seven Oaks General Hospital, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada.
3
Lakeridge Health Corporation, Bowmansville, Ontario, Canada.
4
Department of Family and Community Medicine, University of Toronto and Queen's University, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
5
Hôtel-Dieu de Lévis, Courcelotte, Quebec, Canada.
6
Odette Cancer Centre, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. edward.chow@sunnybrook.ca.
7
Department of Radiation Oncology, Odette Cancer Centre, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, 2075 Bayview Avenue, Toronto, ON, M4N 3M5, Canada. edward.chow@sunnybrook.ca.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

Cancer patients live longer with effective anti-cancer therapy and supportive care. About 30% of cancer survivors (non-palliative cancer patients who completed treatment) suffer from chronic pain, which will be managed by their primary care physician (PCP). The aim of this study was to assess practice patterns and treatment barriers in the management of chronic pain in cancer survivors among PCPs.

METHODS:

A survey using a 16-item questionnaire was sent to PCPs across Canada.

RESULTS:

A total of 162 responses were collected. The majority of participants were in group (59%) or solo (33%) practice, with an average of 25 years of clinical experience. Seventy-one percent of PCPs were practicing in communities of 10,000 to 100,000 people. Respondents were treating approximately 10 cancer survivors with chronic pain per month. The majority of PCPs (59%) reported having "little knowledge" or "some understanding" of chronic pain management in cancer survivors. They did not usually refer these patients to other specialists. Patient comorbidities (79%), pain medication side effects (78%), previous pain treatment (76%), effect of pain on daily functioning (75%), and drug interactions (71%) were identified as factors that guided PCP treatment choices. Major barriers included medication cost (54%), concerns about opioid abuse (51%), and patient non-compliance (46%). PCPs indicated that treatment guidelines (74%) and knowledge of pharmacological (64%) and non-pharmacological (62%) treatment options would help their chronic pain management.

CONCLUSION:

Most PCPs report a lack of knowledge in the management of chronic pain in cancer survivors but are keen to receive medical education on treatment options and clinical practice guidelines.

KEYWORDS:

Cancer; Chronic pain; Needs assessment; Primary care physician; Survey; Survivor

PMID:
28589311
DOI:
10.1007/s00520-017-3774-9
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