Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Front Oncol. 2017 May 22;7:89. doi: 10.3389/fonc.2017.00089. eCollection 2017.

Radiation-Induced Oral Mucositis.

Maria OM1,2,3, Eliopoulos N3,4, Muanza T1,2,3,5.

Author information

1
Faculty of Medicine, Experimental Medicine Department, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada.
2
Radiation Oncology Department, Jewish General Hospital, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada.
3
Lady Davis Institute for Medical Research, Jewish General Hospital, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada.
4
Faculty of Medicine, Surgery Department, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada.
5
Oncology Department, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada.

Abstract

Radiation-induced oral mucositis (RIOM) is a major dose-limiting toxicity in head and neck cancer patients. It is a normal tissue injury caused by radiation/radiotherapy (RT), which has marked adverse effects on patient quality of life and cancer therapy continuity. It is a challenge for radiation oncologists since it leads to cancer therapy interruption, poor local tumor control, and changes in dose fractionation. RIOM occurs in 100% of altered fractionation radiotherapy head and neck cancer patients. In the United Sates, its economic cost was estimated to reach 17,000.00 USD per patient with head and neck cancers. This review will discuss RIOM definition, epidemiology, impact and side effects, pathogenesis, scoring scales, diagnosis, differential diagnosis, prevention, and treatment.

KEYWORDS:

chemotherapy; mesenchymal stromal/stem cells; normal tissue injury; oral mucositis; pathobiology; radiation; radiotherapy

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Frontiers Media SA Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center